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Thread: Do You Wash Your Chicken?

  1. #11
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    mr drinky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tripleq View Post
    I buy all my meat from a local organic farm. No concentrated feed lots, no animals confined to living in their own filth, no unskilled labor processing the meat. Problem solved.
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin0505 View Post
    ...When I get fresh whole, chickens out of the butcher case and wrapped in paper, they tend to be pretty dry/slime free on the outside and require just a quick pat-down with a paper towel.
    Ahh, to live in a place with those options But I agree about getting the slime off, and I do like getting a 'feel' for the chicken and giving it a once over before patting it dry. If I had the option I would get the fresh stuff.

    k.
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  2. #12
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    Yeah I actually just open those little, wet, plastic chicken sacks right in the sink.
    The wedge in uptown has the best price and quality whole fresh I've found so far.

    You live in the country... it seems like there should be SOMEONE with fresh chickens, or at least some just running around that you could catch.


    So when are you moving to The Cities again?
    "I gotta tell ya, this is pretty terrific. Ha hahaha, YEAH!" - Moe (w/ 2 knives). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVt4U...layer_embedded

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin0505 View Post
    So when are you moving to The Cities again?
    Late Feb to early March.

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  4. #14
    Senior Member mpukas's Avatar
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    That article makes a good point, but they take it in the direction of hysteria, hype and controversy just for a story. Instead, they could have said something along the lines "when washing chicken, be careful not to... watch out for... clean adjacent affected areas thoroughly with... ".

    I'm with you guys who only have access to plasti-wrapped chicken-in-a-bag. No matter how fresh it is, it's always got some of it's own liquid leaking out of it, basting in it, and that is not only gross but a great environment for non-friendly bacteria. I have deep single bowl sink, and open the bags in the bottom of the empty sink, rinse with plenty of cold running water, place on a 1/2 sheet pan lined w/ lots of paper towels, wipe dry with more paper towels, and then scrub down the empty sink with hot running water and soap, as well as adjacent counter surfaces if they have gotten wet. I'm usually pretty good and don't splatter.
    Shibui - simplicity devoid of unnecessary elements

  5. #15
    Senior Member mpukas's Avatar
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    While we're on the subject of chicken, are you guys familiar with air-chilled vs water-chilled?

    The bottom line is after chickens are slaughtered, the carcasses have to be chilled as quickly as possible. There are two methods - water bath and a series of chill chambers. Water is easier as it's apparently easier to keep it at consistent temp through circulation, and it's quicker. But water poses the same problem we're talking about here - bacteria growth. So the water bath is treated with something to ward off The Nasties. And while we're at it, we're essentially bringing a freshly off'ed chickens, so let's add some salt and Natural Flavors to mix.

    (btw - Natural Flavors are not natural - they're still chemically derived flavor compound that mimic naturally occurring flavors).

    So if you buy organic chickens that are not air-chilled, you bird has been sitting in a bath of anti-biotics, salt, flavorings, and other leakages from other deceased birds.

    Only air-chilled chickens will say as such on the labeling. Water-chilled birds won't say water-chilled, but say something like "up to 5% solution added" - that's where the "solution" comes from - water-chilling. all that said, it doesn't mean that there aren't good quality water-chilled chickens. I get air-chilled when I can, but sometimes I have to settle for water chilled. Air-chilled are ALWAYS far superior in my experiences.

    This is what I've learned so far, and if anyone knows more/differently, please correct me. Thanks. mpp
    Shibui - simplicity devoid of unnecessary elements

  6. #16
    Senior Member Mrmnms's Avatar
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    I get the impression the article suggests the danger of spreading bacteria is from splashing while washing. If I wash chicken, I submerge it in a pot of cold water in an empty sink, gently swirl the water and carefully drain and dry. Less splashing. Pretty much the way I deal with brined birds too.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    I've been getting the air chilled chicken for a while. Our store stopped carrying it for a while, but they've started again, and it's the only kind I buy. It's pricey, but the brand I've been using tastes a lot better than the "store brand". They whole birds are nicer looking with better skin, and the pieces have been good, too. They seem to do a better job of cleaning it, too, so there's less work getting rid of gnarly hunks left behind. I just need them to start carrying the ground chicken from the air-chilled company. No extra seasoning or liquids.

    Haven't been washing it much lately since I saw a recommendation against it--with this chicken there hasn't seemed to be as much of a need. You don't end up with the pool of slime in the package.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  8. #18
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    I usually don't, unless the chicken is funky. After going to air-chilled chickens for roasting, I don't bother anymore.

  9. #19
    Senior Member AFKitchenknivesguy's Avatar
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    i do not wash my chicken anymore.
    Jason

  10. #20
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    I had a friend who worked at a chicken processing plant, he told me some scary stories. I wash my chicken, I don't know what has happened to that thing before it entered my posession. Also, when you wash and get it nice and dry, instead of just patting the slime/blood off, you can get a much better cook on it. Hell, we rinse all of the carcasses we use for stocks. I wash seafood, vegetables, fruit, grains, poultry, but I have never washed a piece of meat that wasn't chicken.

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