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Thread: Restoring Old Blades

  1. #1
    Weird Wood Pusher Burl Source's Avatar
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    Restoring Old Blades

    I bought an old cleaver on ebay a while back just because I thought it looked kind of cool.
    It had some light rust and minor pitting. My plan was to clean it up and rehandle it.
    I did not want to polish it smooth because I kind of like it looking old.

    Can anyone suggest a way to clean up the surface without removing the surface texture?
    Any suggestions are welcomed.
    Mark Farley / It's a Burl
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  2. #2
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    Been looking into this myself. A lot of folks seem to have gotten good results by soaking in break free CLP and then scrubbing with a scotch brite.

  3. #3
    Barkeeper's friend is a good option. It'll leave the surface greyish and clean enough to use, without getting rid of existing pits and such. Just rinse it well after.
    I try to be the man I am..in times of broken lives. Shattered dreams and plans..standing up to fight. Pressures and demands..staring at the knife. Holding in your hands..

  4. #4
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    +1 on barkeepers friend.

    Another trick that's food safe and may work is ketchup. Wipe on a bunch, let it sit a few minutes than rub off, rinse off....
    The vinegar in ketchup does a good job at helping eat through or loosen rust and dirt. The thickness helps it stay in place....and it works well as a really fine gentle abrasive. I've used it to take really nasty old copper back to a mirror shine (ketchup as cleaner, than buffing) and for rust on metals a bunch of times. I haven't tried it on a knife restoration but no reason it shouldn't help there too.

    One caution though -with ketchup don't leave it on their too long. It's less acidic and lower in vinegar content than mustard, but in the same way mustard's used to force a patina and surface etch, the ketchup could probably do the same if left on too long. Less than ten minutes though, suspect no problem at all.....

  5. #5
    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    It'll remove the scuzz and active rust while making the blade only shinier. All of the character will remain.

  6. #6
    Weird Wood Pusher Burl Source's Avatar
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    Thank You for the advice everyone.
    I guess I will have to actually finish this project.
    Mark Farley / It's a Burl
    Phone 541-592-5071, Email burlsource@burlsales.com
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Sam Cro's Avatar
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    Depending on the equipment you there is Scotch Brite wheels and belts for this very issue .

    Sam

  8. #8
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    I did a little experiment with simichrome metal polish last night. Works good. I think it is similar to the stuff Dave recommended above. I was also thinking that WD40 would have similar properties to CLP products so I gave that a try too. Works well.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post





    It'll remove the scuzz and active rust while making the blade only shinier. All of the character will remain.
    +10 on Flitz!!!
    Your mother was a hamster and your father smelt of elderberries. Now go away you silly man or I shall taunt you a second time!

  10. #10
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    0000 wool, Flitz or 600 to 800 grit wet/dry paper would be my top choices.
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

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