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  1. #11
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mucho Bocho View Post
    I've been throwing pizza's for years and this is the best tasting dough I've ever had. Not even close. I reproduced this recipe exactly. They too about 2 minutes to cook. Without toppings, just cheese and sauce, they cook in about 60 seconds. Even in a regular over 9Kenmore Elite), by preheating to 550 for 20-25 min. I can get the steel plate to about 620--650

    Some secrets

    1.) 00 Caputo Flour
    2.) 1/4 Carbon Steel baking sheet
    3.) Champagne in place of water

    Here is a Linguica pizza with pep/miush/onion I made

    http://seattlefoodgeek.com/2012/07/n...e-pizza-dough/

    Attachment 18234

    Attachment 18236
    hmmm, i might have to get one of those baking sheets! my cordierite stone is great for bread, but i don't like the results with pizza nearly as much. that looks great, though!

  2. #12

    JohnnyChance's Avatar
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    skip the grill, skip the oven and use a large cast iron pan. use one of the dough recipes here, get it nice and thin, med high heat with a little bit of oil, sear one side lightly, flip, add toppings and finish the other side. you can go into the oven to help melt cheeses and such if you need to. depending on your stove you will need to find the right setting for each side of the dough, should only take a few minutes total.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  3. #13
    Senior Member skiajl6297's Avatar
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    Some great information (and fun reads) here on all things pizzamaking.

    http://slice.seriouseats.com/archive...ref=sectionnav

  4. #14
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    If you buy ceramic bricks (from like a home depot) make sure they are unglazed uarry tiles, the Saltillo Tiles are cheap and unglazed for example

  5. #15
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    Wow, thanks - I see you guys take cooking seriously - I like that

    Quite a few advices and suggestions - I will try to implement some of those (maybe over the weekend). I will check those links, but I fear to fall for another obsession (I already have quite a few, japanese kitchen knives and stones being the latest ones)

    But since there were also quite a few questions let me get to those first:

    1) First of all - both our oven and the stove are electric. Oven can make it up to 275 Celsius (527F) with the grill turned on and can keep 250 C (482F) with the normal hearing - what does not sound like particularly much given the numbers that have been mentioned. The stove - since it is electric too - is not really able to get a pan to temperatures that would be high enough. With gas it would be different story (we used to use a iron plate on gas stove at home for similar purposes).

    2) As of now I do not have any stone, tile or thick piece of iron for baking, but I could surely do something about that. What would work better - steel or ceramic? I would guess steel as it transports heat more effectively. But I have learned that putting pizza inside the owen on a baking sheet (that is cold at the time the pizza goes inside the oven) does NOT lead to success.

    3) I live in Germany and I can get my hands on normal (good) bread flour since bread is widely produced around here. So this should not be a problem.

    4) Type of pizza - I would probably prefer to approach more typical pizza (guess that would be the Napolitana). I have never been to NY or Chicago so I do not know what you guys do with pizza there I would like the dough to be on the thin side (just the edges thicker - I love the dough itself) - I prefer most the simpler pizzas when it comes to the toppings.

    5) One question concerning the yeast - we usually use (mostly cakes) fresh yeast - would there be a particular reason to use a powder one instead?

    6) The recipe - I did not use scales (just for the flour) but my recipe would basically be similar as what was mentioned already (flour, water, yeast, salt) - I did not use oil last time (I did in some of my previous attempts).

  6. #16
    Senior Member Talim's Avatar
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    We have an electric oven too and cook pizza in it all the time. I do use a pizza stone though and I mostly use the dough recipe that came with it. It's a mixture of regular flour and some wheat flour. I do think the stone helps a lot so you should definitely get one and try it out first with your dough recipe. I don't have access to fresh yeast so I use the instant one. Might be worth trying instant yeast just to see if it helps your dough rise more.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Von blewitt's Avatar
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    If using fresh yeast, double the amount is the rule of thumb
    Huw
    In order to make delicious food, you must eat delicious food. Jiro Ono

  8. #18
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrisAnderson27 View Post
    I'm in on this one for dough recipes...I love me some pizza!

    The last pizza I made was with store bought dough...on my barbecue grill lol. Didn't turn out too badly . I mostly followed this recipe:

    http://shine.yahoo.com/video/grill-n...225618771.html
    (my friend made her chef's knife lol)

    The sauce was phenomenal!
    I never knew all that was next door. Pretty PO'd my neighbors have been holding out on me. She's a looker! Not a big fan of the belly, but overall composition looked classy. Who made her?
    The girl using her was cute too.
    "I gotta tell ya, this is pretty terrific. Ha hahaha, YEAH!" - Moe (w/ 2 knives). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVt4U...layer_embedded

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin0505 View Post
    I never knew all that was next door. Pretty PO'd my neighbors have been holding out on me. She's a looker! Not a big fan of the belly, but overall composition looked classy. Who made her?
    The girl using her was cute too.
    That's what I'm sayin!

    The maker's name is John Logan. The knife does look a little thick behind the edge though...lol. Here's what he had to say about it:

    The Michigan Chef knife I made a few months ago, now has it own cooking show! The knife is made from all reclaimed materials from the state of Michigan. The pattern welded blade is; cable from Detroit, a file found in a barn, high speed steel from GM, and wrought iron from a ship wreck in lake Michigan. The handle is stabilized cypress that was used for a 100 years as part of a pickle vat.
    Good stuff . You can find a link to the picture of it on the bladesmith's forum if you search 'Michigan Chef Knife'.
    I try to be the man I am..in times of broken lives. Shattered dreams and plans..standing up to fight. Pressures and demands..staring at the knife. Holding in your hands..

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matus View Post
    Wow, thanks - I see you guys take cooking seriously - I like that

    Quite a few advices and suggestions - I will try to implement some of those (maybe over the weekend). I will check those links, but I fear to fall for another obsession (I already have quite a few, japanese kitchen knives and stones being the latest ones)

    But since there were also quite a few questions let me get to those first:

    1) First of all - both our oven and the stove are electric. Oven can make it up to 275 Celsius (527F) with the grill turned on and can keep 250 C (482F) with the normal hearing - what does not sound like particularly much given the numbers that have been mentioned. The stove - since it is electric too - is not really able to get a pan to temperatures that would be high enough. With gas it would be different story (we used to use a iron plate on gas stove at home for similar purposes).

    2) As of now I do not have any stone, tile or thick piece of iron for baking, but I could surely do something about that. What would work better - steel or ceramic? I would guess steel as it transports heat more effectively. But I have learned that putting pizza inside the owen on a baking sheet (that is cold at the time the pizza goes inside the oven) does NOT lead to success.

    3) I live in Germany and I can get my hands on normal (good) bread flour since bread is widely produced around here. So this should not be a problem.

    4) Type of pizza - I would probably prefer to approach more typical pizza (guess that would be the Napolitana). I have never been to NY or Chicago so I do not know what you guys do with pizza there I would like the dough to be on the thin side (just the edges thicker - I love the dough itself) - I prefer most the simpler pizzas when it comes to the toppings.

    5) One question concerning the yeast - we usually use (mostly cakes) fresh yeast - would there be a particular reason to use a powder one instead?

    6) The recipe - I did not use scales (just for the flour) but my recipe would basically be similar as what was mentioned already (flour, water, yeast, salt) - I did not use oil last time (I did in some of my previous attempts).
    If you don't have a stone or steel, you lose all the heat when you open the oven door. At that point your dough is baking too slowly, so all the moisture will be gone by the end. I suspect that's the primary problem at this point.

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