Quantcast
Knife Commentary - Page 5
Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 3456 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 53

Thread: Knife Commentary

  1. #41
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    1,207
    Quote Originally Posted by apicius9 View Post
    Arrgghh, I feel like the lone defender of the honor of the bread knife. You can cut bread with a gyuto just like you can cut fish with a sujihiki. Are you all rice eaters here? Or wonder bread aficionados? Try a gyuto on a woodfire brick oven sourdough rye bread and sweep up the chips after you are done crying!

    Stefan
    I'll join you in defense of the bread knife.

  2. #42
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    3,487
    Quote Originally Posted by apicius9 View Post
    Arrgghh, I feel like the lone defender of the honor of the bread knife. You can cut bread with a gyuto just like you can cut fish with a sujihiki. Are you all rice eaters here? Or wonder bread aficionados? Try a gyuto on a woodfire brick oven sourdough rye bread and sweep up the chips after you are done crying!

    Stefan
    if you pierce the crust with the point first, a gyuto usually has no issue cutting very crusty bread. having said that, i almost always use my Tojiro ITK.

  3. #43
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5,126
    Travel Knife:

    The one knife that I likely couldn't be without - yes, even with my pettysuki, Itinomonn, custom Carter, ZKramer, Yoshikane, the list goes on and on - is my Butch Harner travel knife. I briefly mentioned it in my earlier post about knife length, and as I said, it has changed me. It's all of 175mm along the edge, but with full knuckle clearance, a wicked tip, and a perfect Zebrawood handle (I love Zebrawood), it's the knife that I'm currently most attached to...or, up there, for sure. I bring my travel knife with me for work. I bring it with me if I know I'll be cooking at my in-laws'. I bring it with me when I am going somewhere for over a night, and it might need to be called upon. One thing that I love about having one "go-to", while traveling, is that it forces me to really push the knife to its limits, being used as a honesuki, petty, slicer and of course, a gyuto. So far, so good! I'm amazed at how versatile one great knife can be, which is completely ridiculous considering when a person who is looking to get great knives asks, I/we always answer, "get one good knife and go from there". Kinda makes you think about this wonderful and all encompassing rabbit hole we seem to have fallen down, doesn't it? Oh well, until I find a way out, I'll have a slew of wonderfully hear-treated and ground blades to play with, while another is dragged around with me, from destination to destination.

    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

  4. #44
    I really like the spine profile of that one...and the edge profile looks very useful!
    I try to be the man I am..in times of broken lives. Shattered dreams and plans..standing up to fight. Pressures and demands..staring at the knife. Holding in your hands..

  5. #45
    Is there a trick to that rubber band?

  6. #46
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Honolulu, HI
    Posts
    3,297
    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    if you pierce the crust with the point first, a gyuto usually has no issue cutting very crusty bread. having said that, i almost always use my Tojiro ITK.
    How about "if you pierce the skin with the point first, a gyuto usually can cut a tomato"? Sounds like a bad knife, right? Why is that o.k. for bread? Again, bread and bread knives don't get enough love around here (And I am really only teasing with this...).

    Stefan

  7. #47
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Bay Area
    Posts
    666
    With regards to lengths, I'm reaching for the 180mm gyuto/santoku more and more. Large meals, I'll bring out a larger knife. However, for weeknight meals for the family of 3, the 180mm gets the love.

    The Harner travel knife looks great.

  8. #48
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Honolulu, HI
    Posts
    3,297
    Here is a question: Do you have a knife in your arsenal that would be frowned upon by every respectable knife nerd on this forum, but that you still would not give up? For me this is my old Henckels 230 slicer ('ham knife', as they call it in Germany). This knife has seen heavy abuse, is butt ugly, totally scratched up from failed sharpening attempts (when starting with stones), but I have had it forever and it just feels right. I even had a Nenox 230 for a while and sold it again because I kept reaching for the trusty old Henckels. Certainly not because it even remotely performs the same, but because it is so familiar. And for me as a home cook, edge durability is not such a big deal because I don't work my knives as hard as a pro. So, what's your ugly duckling?

    Stefan

  9. #49
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    103
    I used a thin (#6) cleaver as a bread knife....

    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Travel Knife:

    The one knife that I likely couldn't be without - yes, even with my pettysuki, Itinomonn, custom Carter, ZKramer, Yoshikane, the list goes on and on - is my Butch Harner travel knife. I briefly mentioned it in my earlier post about knife length, and as I said, it has changed me. It's all of 175mm along the edge, but with full knuckle clearance, a wicked tip, and a perfect Zebrawood handle (I love Zebrawood), it's the knife that I'm currently most attached to...or, up there, for sure. I bring my travel knife with me for work. I bring it with me if I know I'll be cooking at my in-laws'. I bring it with me when I am going somewhere for over a night, and it might need to be called upon. One thing that I love about having one "go-to", while traveling, is that it forces me to really push the knife to its limits, being used as a honesuki, petty, slicer and of course, a gyuto. So far, so good! I'm amazed at how versatile one great knife can be, which is completely ridiculous considering when a person who is looking to get great knives asks, I/we always answer, "get one good knife and go from there". Kinda makes you think about this wonderful and all encompassing rabbit hole we seem to have fallen down, doesn't it? Oh well, until I find a way out, I'll have a slew of wonderfully hear-treated and ground blades to play with, while another is dragged around with me, from destination to destination.
    Interesting topic on travel knives, it would be interesting hearing what every one travels with.

    My criteria for a travel knife is:
    Cheap: won't cry if I forget it
    Stainless: low maintenance
    Smallish: no need to scare the locals
    Easy the sharpen: too lazy to haul stones around

    So far my kit is:
    Opinal 8 Stainless


    Dexter Chinese cleaver (more of a nakiri)


    I have to admit its more focused on the fruit and veg side of things. Weirdly, I never eat enough of while traveling.

  10. #50
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5,126
    I have a few "uncool" knives that I won't let go of. Namely, my Icel mini chef that I picked up in Portugal, and my Ivo santoku that is also Portuguese. Both serve a purpose, and I actually really like them...despite their 56hrc.
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •