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Thread: What to do with gifted Shun

  1. #41
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    add $200.

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    I'd bet $10 that the knife had a wire edge, or you hadn't removed enough fatigued steel (especially if you often use a honing rod) when you sharpened. Or both.
    While possible, I sort of doubt it. I have a Shun Classic paring knife that gets virtually the same treatment that doesn't chip out. I also never use a honing rod; I strop instead.

  3. #43
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    I believe if you don't like it you won't use it. So in that sense trade/sell/gift it. If you like the Shun parer then you could trade out for a Hiro one. (it costs about the same as this knife.... ) Ebay is receptive to Shuns at a discount. Hmm maybe return, throw in an extra $150 and get an immersion circulator

  4. #44
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cynic2701 View Post
    I have a Shun Classic paring knife that gets virtually the same treatment that doesn't chip out.
    Very different geometry and use pattern between a parer and a chef's knife. Strops are similar to hones, in that they can create a situation where the edge is fatigued and fails, if you don't sharpen that often and strop a lot. Not as quick as a honing rod, in my experience, but it happens.

  5. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    Very different geometry and use pattern between a parer and a chef's knife. Strops are similar to hones, in that they can create a situation where the edge is fatigued and fails, if you don't sharpen that often and strop a lot. Not as quick as a honing rod, in my experience, but it happens.
    Ok. Hypothetically, if what you say is true, then shouldn't all knives I sharpen with this method end up with a "chippy" edge?

    My Dad also mailed me a couple of his own kitchen knives (which he is much rougher with than I am) for which I've been the sole sharpener for the past several years.

    Here are his Al Mar Santoku (sp?) and Shun Kaji paring knife next to my own Shun Classics:



    Since the Shun Kaji is supposed to be made of SG2 with an HRC value in the 63-64ish range if I recall correctly, shouldn't it exhibit chipping issues? While I don't know what hardness the Al Mar's VG-10 has, I'd guess in the 59-61 HRC range since this is typically what we see in VG-10 kitchen knives. Shouldn't this also exhibit chipping issues?

    Neither the Shun Kaji nor the Al Mar have any chipping issues--their edges were smooth, if dull from being used.

  6. #46
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    For all I know you are hitting your Shun vg-10 knives against a sink or a brick.

  7. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    For all I know you are hitting your Shun vg-10 knives against a sink or a brick.
    I had hoped you would have had greater insight into what may possibly be giving me the chipping issues I've been having with my Shun Classic santoku (sp?). I've had it for a long time, and I'd love to find a way to fix or at least ameliorate the issue. Thanks for taking your time to reply to me. I'll try to avoid hitting sinks and bricks with it going forward.

    Well, I suppose this thread has gone off topic from what I originally had been asking. I guess we can start talking about the relative merits of cast iron vs stainless steel for making popcorn.

  8. #48
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    have you tried putting a microbevel on your shun yet? ive sharpened lots of shun classics and ive noticed many of them are chipped.
    also, the consensus has spoken.cast iron is the way to go for popcorn.

  9. #49
    Yeah, a good percentage of the time there's a small microbevel on the Shun. Whenever I sharpen it (usually every three or four months) I'll form an edge with a small microbevel and maintain it with stropping until it starts needing a sharpening. A few times I've tried making an edge straight from the bevel with no microbevel, but this seems to make the chipping issue worse.

  10. #50
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cynic2701 View Post
    I had hoped you would have had greater insight into what may possibly be giving me the chipping issues I've been having with my Shun Classic santoku (sp?). I've had it for a long time, and I'd love to find a way to fix or at least ameliorate the issue. Thanks for taking your time to reply to me. I'll try to avoid hitting sinks and bricks with it going forward.

    Well, I suppose this thread has gone off topic from what I originally had been asking. I guess we can start talking about the relative merits of cast iron vs stainless steel for making popcorn.
    I was being less sarcastic than I probably appeared to be: my point was that I don't know your environment, and your uses, and your sharpening, so, from my perspective, you might as well be hitting bricks. I've seen a lot of chipped Shuns. I have friends who use them, many, and they often send them to me to be sharpened. After I sharpen, and completely de-burr the knives, the next time they come back, they are dull, and have the occasional chip or bent tip, but no more than any other knife that gets used heavily and sharpened once a year (if that). I've owned, and own Shuns, and they aren't chippy. Maybe yours are particularly chippy. I don't know. Having seen as many as I've seen, though, I reject the idea that they are chippy. I don't reject the idea that they are harder than many knives to de-burr, but it's not a big deal once you get it down.

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