Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Kurouchi Finish

  1. #1

    Kurouchi Finish

    So I think I'm learning the hard way that Kurouchi finish needs a little extra attention. Not sure why I thought Barkeeper's Friend would be a good idea, but I've began to wear away the finish on my 150mm Shigefusa.

    Any suggestions on how to manage this going forward, other than to just let it be as is and not scrub the Kurouchi?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    washington dc
    Posts
    1,471
    Remove it entirely and do an acid etch, then let it patina over it!

  3. #3
    Senior Member Frater_Decus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    128
    Often times you'll find that blades with the firescale left on, such as blades with the kuroichi finish, are coated with a lacquer to prevent oxidation and to preserve the finish. As long as that remains intact over the black part, the finish should last awhile (in other words, no harsh scrubbing or abrasives on that part). With my Murata knives, I removed the lacquer from the blade path with sandpaper, and forced a patina on the jigane and hagane with cider vinegar.
    Vestigia nulla retrorsum.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Frater_Decus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    128
    Here's a really dodgy pic of part of my Nakiri. You can tell that there's still lacquer on the firescale due to the shiny finish.

    Vestigia nulla retrorsum.

  5. #5
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    3,702
    Quote Originally Posted by panda View Post
    Remove it entirely and do an acid etch, then let it patina over it!
    I wouldn't. I suggest treating the kurouchi delicately. I've used gun cold blue to repair damage. It is safe as long as you let it dry and then rinse, and it prevents rust.

  6. #6
    +1 on cold bluing. I use it on tangs when I'm replacing handles, as a rust preventer.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Frater_Decus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    128
    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    I wouldn't. I suggest treating the kurouchi delicately. I've used gun cold blue to repair damage. It is safe as long as you let it dry and then rinse, and it prevents rust.
    Would that be safe go use on the core steel? Sounds interesting.
    Vestigia nulla retrorsum.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wales, UK
    Posts
    907
    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    I wouldn't. I suggest treating the kurouchi delicately.
    +1. Some of these iron cladding materials just won't passivate effectively. You'd be taking a risk.

  9. #9
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    3,702
    Quote Originally Posted by Frater_Decus View Post
    Would that be safe go use on the core steel? Sounds interesting.
    sure, but it does wear off very quickly when any friction is involved. It also tends to stink, but the stink goes away and doesn't transfer to the food. The stink is also better than bare iron oxidizing, in my experience.

  10. #10
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Clayton, NC- surrounded by lots of trees
    Posts
    2,088
    Also, aesthetically KU can hide some fugly blemishes; be it waves or scratches. It's one of those, the further you take it, the more work you'll need to do projects. So, dive into it as a learning experience, or leave it and baby it.
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •