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Thread: wavy edge on old forgecraft

  1. #1
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    wavy edge on old forgecraft

    I bought some forgecraft knives on ebay and one of them has a "wavy edge" - even visible to the native eye although really obvious with a loupe.

    What's the best way to fix this?

    My initial idea is to treat it like a very big chippy knive and just grind away at a low grit stone until a new bevel without a wave is there?

    But I thought I would ask the experts!

    TIA

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    Senior Member bahamaroot's Avatar
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    pictures

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    Wavy in what dimension?

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    It was wavy at the actual edge-not chipped but smooth waves.

    Actually I did some googling after I posted this on other forums since there was nothing here (apropos of nothing I have found the best way to search KKF is to use "thing you are searching for" site:kitchenknifeforums.com on Google and not the forum search)

    ANyway a wavy edge is not uncommon on old razors and the solution they proposed for razors worked great. They called it "bread boarding", you basically hold the knife perpendicular to the stone (a DMT course in my case) and stroke it on the stone from tip to back. It obviously takes the edge completely away but it removed the wavyness instantly and then I worked through a progression of stones and they they are as sharp as stories say old forgecrafts can get

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    Quote Originally Posted by gic View Post
    It was wavy at the actual edge-not chipped but smooth waves.

    Actually I did some googling after I posted this on other forums since there was nothing here (apropos of nothing I have found the best way to search KKF is to use "thing you are searching for" site:kitchenknifeforums.com on Google and not the forum search)

    ANyway a wavy edge is not uncommon on old razors and the solution they proposed for razors worked great. They called it "bread boarding", you basically hold the knife perpendicular to the stone (a DMT course in my case) and stroke it on the stone from tip to back. It obviously takes the edge completely away but it removed the wavyness instantly and then I worked through a progression of stones and they they are as sharp as stories say old forgecrafts can get
    That is exactly how you do it.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  6. #6
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    I diagonally breadboard, but yes.
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

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    Isn't it called 'bread knifing'? Anyway, yep that's how you fix vertical waves. But you will be thickening BTE, so I would recommend you thin out the edge a bit after doing the repair.

  8. #8
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Yes, it is bread knifing. I read the other and wrote it. I just got off shift, so my brain is only 80% here. Haha

    Also, what I meant by diagonal, is more like angled (bread knifing on a 35*, or so angle, so you thin as you fix. That way, when you actually do thin it out, which you will absolutely have to do, there is less metal to remove.
    09/06

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  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Yes, it is bread knifing. I read the other and wrote it. I just got off shift, so my brain is only 80% here. Haha

    Also, what I meant by diagonal, is more like angled (bread knifing on a 35*, or so angle, so you thin as you fix. That way, when you actually do thin it out, which you will absolutely have to do, there is less metal to remove.
    I go more diagonal also...kind of changing angles almost to straight.

    One thing you also have to keep an eye out for is that if there's a hollow on the edge, there's pretty much going to be a hollow on the flat too. It'll still sharpen, but if you look close you'll often see that your the size of your edge bevel varies along the length to one degree or another. This is indicative of high and low spots in the grind. This isn't always that big a deal...but its something to look out for.
    I try to be the man I am..in times of broken lives. Shattered dreams and plans..standing up to fight. Pressures and demands..staring at the knife. Holding in your hands..

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    Love to see some before/after pics if possible.

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