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Thread: Baking Steel for Pizza

  1. #21
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwiefel View Post
    hahahahahaha....I mean, WHAT?!

    Just put some shims/bricks under the feet when you want to use the oven, and take them out when you want to use the stovetop. I guess you could split the difference if you need both.

    More seriously...maybe you could use some bricks to create a platform for the plate? Might lose a significant amount of usable space though.
    Bricks might work, but I'd have to reconfigure stuff a lot, and I'm not sure it's worth it over just getting the 3/8 and keeping it on the rack at all times (like I do with my cordierite stone, currently).

  2. #22
    Looks pretty cool.

    Anybody on the forum got a business idea of making these metal plates and offering them to the community?

    I wold love to get my hands on one (preferably inexpensively). Need to talk to Aldo, but I doubt 30lb of carbon steel in 1/4 will cost $50.

    M


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  3. #23

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    Next up Damascus

  4. #24
    I have the Baking Steel, the original thickness. It does stain. One of the reasons why I bought this is because (1) I didn't want to go the DIY route where I don't know the source of the steel, (2) didn't want to buy a plain sheet of steel and have to resort to some method to remove mill scale, and (3) buying from a company that backs the product. This is a great product in my experience.

    If you're going to use something like this, you shouldn't be cooking a pizza on the bottom shelf of the oven as you will not get enough radiant cooking to cook the top of the pizza as fast as the bottom. Because the steel has so much thermal mass, once it's up to temp, it cooks pizzas anywhere from 4 to 6 minutes depending on the thinness/thickness of my dough. On the bottom of the oven, you'll never cook the toppings as quickly as the bottom. I actually put my Baking Steel on the second to highest rack of my oven, or highest rack. I've tried every rack height in my oven. The highest ones work best. (You can use the broiler method to cook the top, but that's another story, and still, based on my experience, if you're cooking a pizza on the bottom of the oven, and using the broiler method, you're still likely not going to cook the top as quickly as the bottom.)
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  5. #25
    What temp oven are you using when cooking w the steel plate?
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    What temp oven are you using when cooking w the steel plate?
    My oven dial goes to 550 - I have a DCS gas range which has been pretty accurate. But, for the Baking Steel, I'll preheat the steel for 30 minutes, and then run the broiler for another ten minutes with the Baking Steel on the second highest rack before putting a pizza on it.

    I just got a laser thermometer, so the next time I do it, I'll message you with the actual steel temp.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  7. #27
    Senior Member
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    I was going to get the baking steel but decided I want a 16x16 which fits comfortably in my oven. I also wanted 3/8" so getting it from a steel place seems like the route to go. In my case my house contractor was willing to get it for me as he deals with the local steel place a lot and I assume he will get a really good price for me. As soon as he gets around to doing it I'll report back on how hard the mill scale is to get off. But from what I read we should be pretty good at it, as it seems to be rather like an overgrown patina- atleast according to Wikipedia:

    "Mill scale, often shortened to just scale, is the flaky surface of hot rolled steel, iron oxides consisting of iron(II,III) oxide, hematite, and magnetite.

    Mill scale is formed on the outer surfaces of plates, sheets or profiles when they are being produced by rolling red hot iron or steel billets in rolling mills. Mill scale is composed of iron oxides mostly ferric and is bluish black in color. It is usually less than 1 mm (0.039 in) thick and initially adheres to the steel surface and protects it from atmospheric corrosion provided no break occurs in this coating."

  8. #28
    I will give Aldo (NJ Steel baron) a call tomorrow. He gets steel in sheets, so hopefully he has right thickness. W could cut to size, deburr and grind scales off on a wide belt grinder.

    Will report tomorrow.


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

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  9. #29
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    For those who are interested, I looked up on the web the weight per square foot of a36 steel...

    10.3 (1/4)

    12.8 (5/16)

    15.4 (3/8)

    20.5 (1/2)

    so my 16x16 in 3/8 should come in at right around a manageable 24lbs

  10. #30
    Would it not make more sense to have the plate round? My oven can accommodate 15.75" round or 15.75"x18" square.


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

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