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Thread: how robust is the seasoning on your DuBuyer skillet?

  1. #1
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    how robust is the seasoning on your DuBuyer skillet?

    i'm relatively new to carbon steel pans.

    you all motivated me to try it. for the most part it is awesome. it has taken a fair share of the workload from my old griswold cast pans.

    what i dont like is how delicate the seasoning is. yesterday i tossed a few coins of andouille sausage in the pan to set on top of white beans and the pan now has shiny spots where the sausage seems to have cleaned the pan of seasoning.

    i'm not convinced i'll ever get it to the level of my cast iron in terms of seasoning.

    i dont wash it..if it gets bad, i might boil some water in it and wipe it out. that move has taken off seasoning. if i had a Griswold with sloping sides, i might never get into carbon pans.

  2. #2
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    it makes a killer roasting pan for a small chicken/cornish hen.

  3. #3
    Senior Member bkultra's Avatar
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    Carbon steel does not get the same bullet proof seasoning as cast iron, but it is far easier to apply one (I use the stovetop method). Don't over think it just use it knowing you can always repair the seasoning with a quick heating on the hob and wipe of oil.

    If you ever need to scrub the pan just add salt and a bit of oil and go at it.

  4. #4
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    It took a full year of regular use before my first deBuyer was a certified badass. They just love to be used, and used a lot. It's ugly as sin and not nearly as uniform as the seasoning you can get on cast iron, but the performance is there and it never really lets me down. My second deBuyer doesn't see much use and I tried to force a season a bunch of different ways... it's lackluster at best. Maybe just bad technique on my part, but the impression I get is that you just gotta put the time into using the hell out of them.

  5. #5
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    Interesting... I would've thought that the grease from the sausage would HELP the seasoning, not damage it. I presume you didn't use metal tools during cooking?

  6. #6
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    The one on our pan is quite good, no sticking when making eggs or pancakes, but the pan itself deformed (bottom bulging outwards) considerably and now is deformed both in cold and hot state what makes it hard to use on glass-cooktop. Part of the reason may be that the bottom is slightly larger than the diameter of the bottom. Maybe also because of the cleaning procedure (that otherwise work perfectly) - after using I would heat up the pan up to smoking point (with most food-rests and oil removed) and then splash it with water - this would un-stick most of the leftovers. After that I only clean it with steel-pad and dry with paper.

    I have recently bought a small Turk carbon pan (it has shallow crossing ridges and it was the cheapest one) and that one keeps flat perfectly so far.

    But I agree with what was bkultra said - they need many uses until the full patina develops.

  7. #7
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pirendeus View Post
    Interesting... I would've thought that the grease from the sausage would HELP the seasoning, not damage it. I presume you didn't use metal tools during cooking?

    some sausage will contain added sugar which will cause a problem...

    nothing wrong with a metal spatula as long as you are careful how you use it as a well seasoned pan should just release the food (though tongs always seem to scratch even when I'm careful). IMO, chopstix are best tool for these pans by far.
    once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

  8. #8

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    I use de buyer pans I season myself using flaxseed oil and the stove method in a professional kitchen and they see loads of action. The seasoning once you develop enough layers lasts for a good few months of quite a lot of punishment. One thing is to never boil anything in them and wipe with a rag/sponge to get any residue food off them as soon as possible.

  9. #9
    Senior Member DamageInc's Avatar
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    This is my 32cm frying pan after 1½ year of use. Nothing sticks really, and it's smooth as glass. My one rule is no acids for more than a minute. So if I use it as a roasting tray for chicken (which I am going to do tonight), I'll deglaze the fond with white wine (or vinegar) very quickly, and then transfer into a small saucepan, continuing the sauce from there. No damage to the seasoning if done right. Usually if I know that I have to cook something acidic for a longer time, I'll just use a stainless skillet.



    I find carbon steel pans much easier to season and maintain than my Lodge Cast Iron. Nearly all of my cast iron has been sitting on the shelf since I got my de Buyer pans.
    Don't drink out of ornamental ponds in Tiergarten. You will get sick.

  10. #10
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    Mine are nowhere that smooth, might be time to strip it back and start from scratch. Did you use flax seed?

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