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Thread: "Thinning behind the edge"?

  1. #151
    Quote Originally Posted by Salty dog View Post
    Oh, good then?

    ?
    Couldn't care less either way. I know I'm full of sh1t

    Biggest beef ribs I ever had were in Oklahoma. The size of my forearm.
    "Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough." —Mark Twain

  2. #152
    Quote Originally Posted by mano View Post
    Couldn't care less either way. I know I'm full of sh1t

    Biggest beef ribs I ever had were in Oklahoma. The size of my forearm.
    Fiber would take care of that problem. Also where in Oklahoma were these beef ribs? I'm curious/hungry!

  3. #153
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    Frankly I am embarrassed by the statements by most of the pros in this thread. A properly maintained knife cuts better than one that doesn't, regardless if it is maintained by a pro, a home user, Dave or Jon. And you don't have to cut 1000 pounds of product a week to evaluate proper geometry. Yes, we use our knives a lot, much more than someone could even begin to use them at home. So they get sharpened more. And we require they to perform well. So why aren't we the champions of thinning? This entire argument is backwards. It is the home user who should be saying "ehh, you thin too much", because they don't sharpen that often! The more you sharpen the more you are required to spend time maintaining the proper geometry. We sharpen a lot so whether you like it or not, our knives get thicker, faster.

    No one is suggesting you spend an hour every night on a 400 grit stone thinning your knife. Maintain your edge how you like, high grit stone, strop, diamond plate, rod, etc and you should get a couple weeks (or more) out of it. Then, when you do have to go back to the stones, spend 5 extra minutes on low-ish grit stone (I usually use a 1200) and maintain it. I know we work a lot, but I have time for 5 minutes every 2 weeks. I don't refinish and my regular sharpening only takes 5 minutes as it is. Especially with a thin, properly maintained edge. And then guess what, the edges last longer, they cut better when they are duller, the come back easier on my diamond plate and then ending up extending my time between sharpenings. If you generally use lasers, then thinning is not as critical. The knife is very thin for the majority of the blade. It's performance will still begin to suffer after a few sharpenings, but it will be less noticeable. And you can put off thinning it longer because when you do, there isn't a lot of metal to remove. But a Kato? Or Gengetsu? Heiji? Unless you thin as you go, every time you sharpen, you WILL have to spend an hour on it at some point. I think I would rather spend an extra 5-10 minutes every time I bring it back to the stones.

    Is Edipis an a-hole? Yes. Is he right? Yes. Am I an a-hole? Yes, and I bet most of you are too in your kitchens. And like me I bet you spend a lot of your time busting the chops of those you work with. He's busting your chops. Feel free to dig in and defend your ground, but at the end of the day, he is right about pretty much everything he has said on sharpening & thinning in this thread. He might have been wrong to question your ability to determine when a knife needs thinning or how to properly maintain it, but frankly I don't blame him. This is the internet, unless you have handled someones work personally, there is really no way to know if their work backs up their talk. Doesn't matter how many hundreds of pounds of carrots you have cut.
    Honestly, I agree with pretty much most of this, my only point through all of this is as a pro, our knives do get abused, and high frequency of sharpening will shorten their lives. As a large investment I choose to baby them as much as possible, that's it. I simply questioned if biweekly sharpening and thinning was excessive. Simple as that.
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
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  4. #154
    For me it comes down to everybody that sharpens needs to know how to thin because at some point it has to be done. At that point you can decide how much and how often you want to thin and phuck what anyone else thinks about it. Ooopps, I think I just broke a rule!

  5. #155
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    it seems like a few of us here may have different expectations about how long our knives should last. while a lifetime of use would be nice, maintaining geometry would be of more importance-whether that means the knife last 7-8 years or 20+ years. ive never tried to maintain an edge at work by simply stropping, i guess i should. speaking as a pro chef, i can say i wear out my edges pretty quickly only to sharpen them again, and again, each week. but im happy with my techinque, i would probably be a little offended if somebody told me what i was doing was "wrong". afterall, the way i sharpen suits my needs. to each their own.

  6. #156
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salty dog View Post
    P.S. This morning I processed a case of beef back ribs. Perhaps a discussion of the pros and cons of a meat band saw at home or at work?
    Today I cut a slice of bread, a couple slices of cheese, cleaned up a pork tenderloin, and will chop up a couple zucchinis, an onion, a carrot, and a handful of mushrooms. A meat band saw is obviously overkill for EVERYONE. NO ONE should be allowed to use one. I AM RIGHT!!!!!! And anyone who disagrees with me is an IDJIT. Especially if they have a different level of education, work in a professional kitchen, are a home cook, are a different gender, different political bent, or the wind is out of the east or south.


    Anyone for popcorn?
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  7. #157
    Quote Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post




    Today I cut a slice of bread, a couple slices of cheese, cleaned up a pork tenderloin, and will chop up a couple zucchinis, an onion, a carrot, and a handful of mushrooms. A meat band saw is obviously overkill for EVERYONE. NO ONE should be allowed to use one. I AM RIGHT!!!!!! And anyone who disagrees with me is an IDJIT. Especially if they have a different level of education, work in a professional kitchen, are a home cook, are a different gender, different political bent, or the wind is out of the east or south.


    Anyone for popcorn?
    If its not Orville Redenbacher then no thank you!

  8. #158
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    Deleted post.
    Wrong thread.

  9. #159
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by labor of love View Post
    afterall, the way i sharpen suits my needs. to each their own.
    I agree with this. The way I sharpen is pretty far from perfect and not exactly the way most people would do it, but it works, so I don't give a damn if I'm maintaining the geometry and all that to be honest. Different strokes for different folks. So someone may look at my knives and say I'm doing it wrong, which in itself would be wrong, knives are tools for certain tasks and if it fits the tasks I give it, how can it be wrong? I have an MSc and I'm a pro chef. Does that make me smart?

  10. #160
    Quote Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post




    Today I cut a slice of bread, a couple slices of cheese, cleaned up a pork tenderloin, and will chop up a couple zucchinis, an onion, a carrot, and a handful of mushrooms. A meat band saw is obviously overkill for EVERYONE. NO ONE should be allowed to use one. I AM RIGHT!!!!!! And anyone who disagrees with me is an IDJIT. Especially if they have a different level of education, work in a professional kitchen, are a home cook, are a different gender, different political bent, or the wind is out of the east or south.


    Anyone for popcorn?
    As long as it has real butter, thank you!

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