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Thread: "Thinning behind the edge"?

  1. #21
    Senior Member cclin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NO ChoP! View Post
    I'm still a firm believer that many are too quick to remove a bunch of metal. Why thin and sharpen so frequently? Does ones knife really need a full progression starting all the way down to low grit full thinning every week? I like to try and do as little metal removal as possible, increasing my knifes longevity. I do agree that some knives need a bit of tuning, and thinning is all part of upkeep; that being said, I only resort to a full progression when my actual bevel has deteriorated, which takes a ton of abuse to achieve. Usually touch ups will get me through for a very, very long time.
    Totally agree!! I've seen many thinned knives with mess up blade geometry.
    Charles ***[All statements I made here only my personal opinion and nothing more!]*** & Please bare with me for my crappy English!!

  2. #22
    I don't know guys.... It really could be ok depending on how he sharpens... I have knives I've thinned at least once a week and they are still around after almost 8 years. Just because you're thinning doesn't mean you have to be removing a ton of metal... It could be just a bit each time... Just enough to keep the knife right where you want it geometry-wise

  3. #23
    Is there something particular you look for when you can say that you've remove enough metal when thinning? Is there going to be a burr too?

  4. #24
    i just eyeball it... a large part of being good at sharpening is having experience using the knives (or getting great feedback from someone who uses them), so you know what will work for a particular steel, HT, intended use, etc. Thinning doesnt always have to create a burr (and in many cases doesnt), but it is possible to thin so much as to create a burr. It just depends on what you are trying to do and how thin you want to go.

  5. #25
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    +2 for the diagram

  6. #26
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Talim View Post
    Is there something particular you look for when you can say that you've remove enough metal when thinning? Is there going to be a burr too?
    i alway thin for a few minutes then cut something to test, and then thin some more...until it feels right.

  7. #27
    Assuming you are not screwing up the geometry by thinning, how does repeated thinning reduce the life of the knife? Rarely ever are you hitting the edge while thinning, the knife isn't going to get shorter. It will get shorter from sharpening, but not thinning. It will get just get skinnier. When you go on a diet, you lose weight, you don't get shorter.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  8. #28
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    When you go on a diet, you lose weight, you don't get shorter.
    I'm not sure if you were trying to be funny Johnny but that cracked me up.

    One thing you can give and still keep...is your word.

  9. #29
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    Assuming you are not screwing up the geometry by thinning, how does repeated thinning reduce the life of the knife?
    It'll make it more flexible surely? If you're used to a knife with no flex, once is starts to happen it could limit the tasks you use it for and once it starts flexing unless you reduce the height of the blade, it's only gonna get worse

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by stevenStefano View Post
    It'll make it more flexible surely? If you're used to a knife with no flex, once is starts to happen it could limit the tasks you use it for and once it starts flexing unless you reduce the height of the blade, it's only gonna get worse
    That depends on the grind of the rest of the knife really. On a knife with a convex/blended diamond cross section, what you do to the edge isn't really going to be relevant for a good, long time....probably not till long after you've turned the thing into a filet knife. The same for an 'I' type grind like a Takeda. Even if you eventually make it a 'T' grind, that T is going to still provide the majority of the stiffness.

    Mostly the knives that would be affected are truly even flat grinds.

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