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Thread: do u doubt your dishes?

  1. #21
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    This thread made me think of people who get a dish seasoned the way it should be and pull out the salt shaker and start dumping salt on it, or soy sauce, or ketchup, etc.. I guess that could be a form of criticism, implying that it needed to have some extra stuff added. Sometimes I think you have to consider the source, different people have different tastes, so I suppose a critique by a "food expert" should carry more weight than a critique by a random member of the public.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by olpappy View Post
    This thread made me think of people who get a dish seasoned the way it should be and pull out the salt shaker and start dumping salt on it, or soy sauce, or ketchup, etc.. I guess that could be a form of criticism, implying that it needed to have some extra stuff added. Sometimes I think you have to consider the source, different people have different tastes, so I suppose a critique by a "food expert" should carry more weight than a critique by a random member of the public.
    I actually disagree with that. How much a certain food is seasoned is dependent on who tastes it. For example, me and my peers at work have quite different tolerance levels for saltiness, heat and so on. So as far as that goes, a so called 'food expert' will also have his own preference for how much seasoning goes onto the food as he is human like the rest of us. To me a critique by a normal customer hold as much weight as one by an expert. The only reason we make a huge fuss is cause his review is gonna come out on some highly frequented website/blog/newspaper column and it's gonna affect future business to a certain degree.

    I constantly doubt the dishes I put out, though I'm only in charge of the appetizers. I just always have that niggling thought at the back of my mind telling me that something could have been done better. Better dressing, better presentation, etc. Probably due to my relative inexperience.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadMel View Post
    I actually disagree with that. How much a certain food is seasoned is dependent on who tastes it. For example, me and my peers at work have quite different tolerance levels for saltiness, heat and so on. So as far as that goes, a so called 'food expert' will also have his own preference for how much seasoning goes onto the food as he is human like the rest of us. To me a critique by a normal customer hold as much weight as one by an expert. The only reason we make a huge fuss is cause his review is gonna come out on some highly frequented website/blog/newspaper column and it's gonna affect future business to a certain degree.

    I constantly doubt the dishes I put out, though I'm only in charge of the appetizers. I just always have that niggling thought at the back of my mind telling me that something could have been done better. Better dressing, better presentation, etc. Probably due to my relative inexperience.
    I totally agree BUT I do have issue with people dumping stuff on what I cook BEFORE they even taste it!

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    I totally agree BUT I do have issue with people dumping stuff on what I cook BEFORE they even taste it!
    That's my pet peeve as well.
    "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." --Albert Einstein

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockbox View Post
    That's my pet peeve as well.
    It actually ranks among the top few. Mine is when people come into an Italian restaurant and says that they are strictly vegetarian, which means they can't have eggs, honey, milk, and strangely enough, garlic, onions and anything of that family, in addition to meat...
    And you know the best thing? We are located next to a vegetarian restaurant... That is the single most irritating group of people that I have encountered.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by MadMel View Post
    It actually ranks among the top few. Mine is when people come into an Italian restaurant and says that they are strictly vegetarian, which means they can't have eggs, honey, milk, and strangely enough, garlic, onions and anything of that family, in addition to meat...
    And you know the best thing? We are located next to a vegetarian restaurant... That is the single most irritating group of people that I have encountered.
    What the hell kind of vegan is that? Do they think "elephant garlic" comes from an elephant?
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  7. #27
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    I gotta say, that's a new one to me.

  8. #28
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    for myself, I doubt dishes all the time. When I do private VIP functions, where money is a non issue, I can use the best quality products available. Then, no worries.

    However, from a business stand point, where cost/price is a major factor, I can only use products that fit into a price structure. So yes, not being able to use the highest quality product for any given dish makes me always think "man, this would be so much better if"

    a chef relies on staff for line work or prep, so it is just as important to have a quality brigade so one can feel confidant that the products that reach the customer is of the highest standard, and with great pride.

  9. #29

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    There is a bit of recognition that customers will alter a dish to their liking, that's why tables have salt, soy sauce, wasabi, bbq sauce, hot sauce, mustard, etc. But the people salting the food before they eat are telling you something. They have a salt addiction.

    The combination of salts and simple sugars creates a reward stimulus that is the heart of America's health problems. You shouldn't see a rude person, you should remember that you are witnessing the #1 cause of death in America.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    There is a bit of recognition that customers will alter a dish to their liking, that's why tables have salt, soy sauce, wasabi, bbq sauce, hot sauce, mustard, etc. But the people salting the food before they eat are telling you something. They have a salt addiction.

    The combination of salts and simple sugars creates a reward stimulus that is the heart of America's health problems. You shouldn't see a rude person, you should remember that you are witnessing the #1 cause of death in America.
    LOL!!!

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