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Thread: do u doubt your dishes?

  1. #41
    Senior Member mateo's Avatar
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    Home cook here... but to answer the basic question, yes I do doubt my dishes. What I find myself doing is comparing my dish to something you would eat in a restaurant -- if it doesn't taste like it would/could be served in a nice (not 3 Star Michelin) restaurant I'm generally not happy with it. Then again, as I've gotten to be a better and better cook, I certainly tend to enjoy restaurant food less and less.

    Although I do have a question for those Chefs working -- do you feel as if when you're cooking something you've become almost... desensitized to it's aromas and flavors and simply will NOT taste as good if you didn't make it? I kinda feel this way as a home cook -- especially if I'm braising or stewing, because I'm smelling it for hours.

  2. #42
    Sometimes it can be like that. You have to either back off the concept of the dish and just make it with care and occasional tasting, or completely immerse yourself in the concept of making the dish. This is especially true with soups. There are so many moving parts, and making a great soup requires so much tasting and standing in the aromatic steam, that by the time you are done, you are sick of it!

    As for restaurant food, the way I see it, food on a 1-10 is like this:
    1-5 - can/should get it at home(why pay for lackadaisical preparation?)
    5-9 - should get it at a restaurant(why work that hard for dinner?)
    10 - can only be gotten at home. Restaurant food, by nature, has to please a lot of different people and tastes. A lot of the best food I've ever eaten was home-cooked--best brisket, best burger, best whole turkey, best apple pie, best cup of coffee, the list goes on.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    Sometimes it can be like that. You have to either back off the concept of the dish and just make it with care and occasional tasting, or completely immerse yourself in the concept of making the dish. This is especially true with soups. There are so many moving parts, and making a great soup requires so much tasting and standing in the aromatic steam, that by the time you are done, you are sick of it!

    As for restaurant food, the way I see it, food on a 1-10 is like this:
    1-5 - can/should get it at home(why pay for lackadaisical preparation?)
    5-9 - should get it at a restaurant(why work that hard for dinner?)
    10 - can only be gotten at home. Restaurant food, by nature, has to please a lot of different people and tastes. A lot of the best food I've ever eaten was home-cooked--best brisket, best burger, best whole turkey, best apple pie, best cup of coffee, the list goes on.
    I believe that becoming desensitized to the flavour and aroma is probably due to palate fatigue. It happens all the time cause you are constantly tasting, probing, smelling so your taste buds get tired in a sense.
    I really agree with the rating you have there except maybe I'll go 7-9 for getting it at a restaurant. It's gotta be above average for me to go there. And yeah the best Risotto I've had was made at home. Same with fish and seafood.

  4. #44
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    I love this thread. I have learned how to cook to the cooks around me to their ability. So I know I am not cooking the best dish that I can. I may seem like I am sounding cocky but I have had many customers ask "who made this?". To later ask for me to prepare it when I am not at that station. Have had people walk out when I was off work for the day. Many cooks out there don't put their heart into a dish, but cut corners to just get "the slop" out there. I don't like this but it is true, and not just in a kitchen either.

    I agree with Chef Niloc that when in a position of leadership you have to be 100% sure of the dish. If you are 99.9% sure the waitstaff and other cooks will pick up on that.

    When I am coming up with something new I doubt all the time. When asking if something is good I usually ask if does this need something else to round out the flavor? You will get a better response.

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