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First Quality Gyuto Purchase - <Opinions Needed> - Page 7
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Thread: First Quality Gyuto Purchase - <Opinions Needed>

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by joetbn View Post
    Go to a music store and pick up a set of acoustic guitar bridge pins, anywhere from $5.00 - $20.00 for a set of 6 depending on material. plastic, ebony, boxwood, ivory, ect. they are perfect size.
    I have used these also,saw them shorter & whittle a little,like the black ones wt. abaloni inlay.XooMG great choice,you got yourself a fine knife

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    It can be. On the other hand, I've found that quite a few knives that I thought were just okay at one point, are actually really nice to use. Sometimes it just takes a bit of getting to know your knife. Thinner knives are generally more beginner-friendly, in my opinion.
    Yes and easier to sharpen.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithsaltydog View Post
    I have used these also,saw them shorter & whittle a little,like the black ones wt. abaloni inlay.XooMG great choice,you got yourself a fine knife
    Thanks. I actually got a pack of six ebony/abalone pins...only one or two are really pretty but that's what I get for not being able to see before buying. I don't have a big enough drill bit at the moment, so I drilled a much smaller hole and am temporarily using a decapitated cotton swab as a pin.

    The handle is iichi so the ho saya, which seems a bit big but fits tightly and wobble-free with the new pin, is kind of pale. I just put on a layer of tung oil and will let it soak in and dry a bit. Considered a stain but don't have any.

    The Yusuke is an impressive knife. I really like the geometry and the thin edge. Though I only got the 210mm gyuto, it's a long knife for my kitchen, which until now has only seen my 170mm cleaver and some smaller knives. Haven't had a chance to cut with it yet (cutting board hasn't arrived yet), but hope to get a chance soon.

    Still wonder about the Ginga, but I think I made a pretty good choice, as a few of you have said. I thought about a junker gyuto to cut my teeth on the blade design and cutting methods (coming from a Chinese slicer background), but didn't want another rubbish knife laying around. Might still be a good idea though since I'm handling the Yusuke so delicately right now.

  4. #64
    Senior Member Seb's Avatar
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    You can cut on plastic no problem. I never bother with my wooden boards any more.

  5. #65
    Senior Member ChiliPepper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seb View Post
    You can cut on plastic no problem. I never bother with my wooden boards any more.
    +1

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seb View Post
    You can cut on plastic no problem. I never bother with my wooden boards any more.
    I'm actually waiting on a small rubber board since I have no board in my current apartment, but it's very interesting to hear about using plastic. Wasn't expecting that in a community like this. Thanks for the breath of fresh air after a lot of reading about end grain boards.

    I'm still on my first coat of tung oil and have some work to do, but wanted to share a picture of my proud new acquisition...


  7. #67
    As for the board goes, I am strongly believer that wood is much better then plastic. Unless the things you value are lightness ans dishwasher safeness.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by XooMG View Post
    I'm actually waiting on a small rubber board since I have no board in my current apartment, but it's very interesting to hear about using plastic. Wasn't expecting that in a community like this. Thanks for the breath of fresh air after a lot of reading about end grain boards.

    I'm still on my first coat of tung oil and have some work to do, but wanted to share a picture of my proud new acquisition...

    That Ebony inlay pin looks good,Enjoy your new blade,it's a good cutter you don't have to baby it

  9. #69
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    I did another inspection of my Ginga knives, and I'd like to add that they don't seem to be ground quite as thin as the Sakai Yusuke or Konosuke knives. The spine at the tip is a little thicker as is the blade about 1cm above the edge. The tips on the Konosukes seem especially thin on my HD2 and HH. The Ginga is still an awesome knife, but just commenting on my specimens. It'll probably spare the knives from a tip chip since Konosukes are known to encounter tip chips pretty easily. This is a comparison between a Western handled Ginga and a wa-handled Konosuke and Sakai Yusuke. It might be just my specimens. They are still very thin behind the edge. Those Yusuke photos look sooo purty.

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