Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 38

Thread: What Happens When You Abolish Tipping

  1. #11
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Portland, Maine
    Posts
    2,052
    A couple of Oregonites just moved to Maine, and starting working at our new joint. They were utterly shocked that tipping out the BOH wasn't SOP. I'm not a big fan of forced gratuity. I am a big fan of sharing the fecking wealth. I've worked both sides, and know the weight they both carry. One isn't necessarily more than the other. Lots of factors to consider on both sides. But no matter how you break it down- there's a huuuuuge disparity of wealth. It's effed up.
    The AI does not love you, nor does it hate you, but you are made out of atoms it might find useful for something else. - Eliezer Yudkowsky

  2. #12
    It's important to realize, or remember, that pay is never related to amount of labor or hardness of work, it is related to marginal product. In a lot of cases the simple fact that front of the house is customer facing means that they add more value to the business even if they don't work that hard, and in back of the house hard work doesn't change the fact that many line positions are basically plug in. Not saying it is how we would like things to be if we were benevolent gods, just that it is important to understand things through the lens of how we understand compensation on a larger scale.

  3. #13
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    dirty south, louisiana
    Posts
    2,306
    Quote Originally Posted by mzer View Post
    In a lot of cases the simple fact that front of the house is customer facing means that they add more value to the business even if they don't work that hard, and in back of the house hard work doesn't change the fact that many line positions are basically plug in.
    at the same time viewership of pseudo chef/foodie shows is at an all time high. not trying to get in a pissing contest over whos job is more important in any particular restaurant, but people dine out primarily for the food,not the service. i think its pretty respected among the civilians that the BOH talent is a better gauge of the percieved quality of a restaurant rather than the service. then again, im sorta biased

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Bay area
    Posts
    507
    Chez Pannise in Berkeley where I live has been doing this more or less forever however I don't know if any of it goes to the BOH, does anyone know...

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by labor of love View Post
    at the same time viewership of pseudo chef/foodie shows is at an all time high. not trying to get in a pissing contest over whos job is more important in any particular restaurant, but people dine out primarily for the food,not the service. i think its pretty respected among the civilians that the BOH talent is a better gauge of the percieved quality of a restaurant rather than the service. then again, im sorta biased
    Yeah, I'm not trying to argue, because I don't disagree with you in theory and because I spent a good part of my younger adult years on a line and none in the front of the house, so I obviously agree in some way there too. However, read Yelp! reviews and others and see if you think most people have any damn clue about what makes food good. I think that most watchers of Top Chef or whatever are watching for sporting and drama reasons, but what do I know, I can't stand them. What I am saying, I guess, is that people might think they care about the food more, but they often can't tell, whereas they can tell about good service, and money spent tends to be a better indicator of reality than words, especially when sticking to words reflecting something less than truth gives off a good bit of connoisseurship and social cache.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Zwiefel View Post
    What about adding a second gratuity line, for tipping BOH? Let the diner choose where the money goes.
    Definitely. Food can be great, service can be questionable. No need to make both sides suffer.

  7. #17
    FWIW, the history of gratuity is that it is paid in personal service encounters and not for products. I don't see how adding gratuity to a product, say food, is going to work. Social norms can certainly be created, but this seems like kind of a clumsy one.

  8. #18

    Zwiefel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Little Rock, AR
    Posts
    2,373
    Quote Originally Posted by mzer View Post
    FWIW, the history of gratuity is that it is paid in personal service encounters and not for products. I don't see how adding gratuity to a product, say food, is going to work. Social norms can certainly be created, but this seems like kind of a clumsy one.
    That's a good point...and BoH isn't likely to know which item was sent to your table, nor even that this is your 25th visit to the restaurant. Seems like that would have to be addressed for there to be a service opportunity there.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  9. #19
    People don't see going to a restaurant as buying a product; it's "entertainment." Tipping is usually based on satisfaction with the server, but sometimes the food (it's a product, but I don't think it's perceived the way you mean) affects the tip.

    BOH should get a cut of the action.
    "Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough." —Mark Twain

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Bangor Maine
    Posts
    341
    I don't understand the whole tipping thing anyway. I have never worked in a restaurant, so I may not have a full perspective. I am not socially expected to tip my electrician, children's daycare provider, my doctor, person who helps me find something at the store ect. Why is it tied to the one service of taking my order, bringing it out and keeping my drink full?

    That being said, I typically tip a standard 20% when eating out. Even if the service is not great, I figure that the restaurant it not paying the servers a living wage and there is a very good chance were not trying to provide inadequate service or being lazy , stuff just happens.

    Having to rely on "gracious" tippers and getting stiffed by cheapskates must suck.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •