Quantcast
(UK) Global 5 Knife block - any good? Any decent alternatives?
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: (UK) Global 5 Knife block - any good? Any decent alternatives?

  1. #1

    (UK) Global 5 Knife block - any good? Any decent alternatives?

    Hello everybody.
    Unashamedly, I'm a noob with all these fancy knives.
    The reason I ended up here is because I've been trying to find out about the sense in buying a particular knfie set.
    My girlfriend and I have been thinking for quite a while about getting a Global knife set (I know, I know).

    We have so far not pushed the button on a purchase, but something which spurred me on to do some research is the fact I have some vouchers for a well known UK supermarket chain, and that there is a Global promo on a particular knife block which gives me double value on my vouchers on the set.

    Ie - I have about £50 sterling in vouchers (£100 due to the promo) which will reduce the block price from £300 to £200.

    I know that Global seem to be fairly well regarded (even if they aren't crazy brilliant) - but could I spend my £200 better?

    Here's the set here.

    18cm G-55 chefs knife
    16cm GS-61 bread/sandwich knife
    16cm GS-5 vegetable knife
    8cm Gsf-46 peeling knife
    11cm Gsf-49 utility knife

    From calculation, individually this set is worth approximately £295 based solely on the knives sold separately.
    The block I guess you get for free more or less from your £300 current retail price.
    At that price I don't think it represents value given that ordinarily I probably don't need all of these knives and thus wouldn't buy them, all things being equal.

    But at £200 - is this a worthwhile purchase, and at this price point can I do better? (ie a smaller group of knives but better performance - or whatever)

    I've read up some of "An Edge in the kitchen" - I'm about a third through it, so I've found out some interesting stuff about knives and knife manufacture and so on.

    But I'm still at a bit of a loss regarding these knives.
    Especially given that the largest knife is the Cooks knife - the G55 and not the recommended G2 in the "An Edge in the Kitchen" book.

    So - apologies for the lengthy opening post, and apologies that it's a question.

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,098
    To understand the Globals you
    should see them in their context.
    They were the first Japanese knives meant for a Western general public used to very soft heavy German blades. In the time of their introduction, mid 80's, the Globals were revolutionary in the eyes of that same general public because of their low weight, sharpness out of the box, flat profile, good geometry. Please note their in our eyes soft steel is very forgiving people hadn't to change their poor habits too much. Add to that the easy availability and appealing design and you understand the commercial success.
    It has never been a knife for the
    little few.
    Since their introduction, a lot of
    much better knives have become
    available to a broather public as
    well. So, the Globals have become
    somewhat outdated, but were an
    introduction to better knives for a
    lot of people. Still, Globals are IMHO much better knives than their Germans counterparts.
    Personally, I don't like their steel -- sharpening them is not exactly very funny, and I'm not enchanted by their design. A few of their knives are -- within their limits --great performers, though. I have
    especially the G2 and GS5 in mind.

  3. #3
    For £200 = $319.56 us dollar, you could buy a few better knives. Namely the chefs knife which is compared to a 180mm global you will be stuck with. Are you sure you don't want a longer chef's knife? 240mm is a great size for someone who has only worked with smaller knives and even for a home cook. If not, a 210mm will be a much more versatile knife than a 180mm. I'd think if I were on a budget and I only needed a decent chefs that would outperform a global, I'd get sayyyy... a 240mm Gesshin Uraku, and compliment it with a few cheaper knives, maybe a suji, petty and a santoku?. I have some Fujiwaras and some Tojiros that are great knives and would outperform a global for cheaper. Or get a few stones thrown in the mix.
    For example...
    Fujiwara FKM 270mm sujihiki $80
    Gesshin Uraku stainless 240mm gyuto $155
    Tanaka Korouchi Blue #2 santoku $58
    King combo stone 1/6 $40
    That's 3 great knives and a combo stone for $333 us dollars, just slightly over budget.
    That's just an example but there are great deals on good knives if you look.

  4. #4
    Yeah the size of the cooks knife is really off putting. Is this jus a setting for people who don't know any better?

  5. #5
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,098
    Excellent idea, just skip the santoku. You will need the difference to pay HM customs, VAT, handling costs etc. if you're unlucky.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,098
    Quote Originally Posted by Ludwig View Post
    Yeah the size of the cooks knife is really off putting. Is this jus a setting for people who don't know any better?
    some people feel inconfortable with large blades. The idea of a chef's knife though is to replace any other, and to perform well, it does need some length.
    I don't understand the sense of a 180mm gyuto, you better have a 190mm santoku and a petty for tip work instead.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,098
    But a good 270 or 240 will perform much better.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Denmark, Copenhagen
    Posts
    162
    I like Vic's idea - but I will replace the santoku by a parer and the sujihiki by a petty. Again you have to think what is on your menu. I rarely use my Suji, actualy I would have been better of with a yanagiba as I use my suji more for filleting / skining fish than slicing meat but Gyuto + parer + a combi stones would be into my list.

    Now about the size, of the knife can be very personal. I am a home cook, I started with 21cm which I found "heavy" and uncomfortable, I replaced it with a 18cm and now I use only 24cm (I am not going to use a 27cm Gyuto/Chef's as I am limited by space).

    V

  9. #9
    Agreed, the santoku isn't necessary.
    That was just an example but I have been using my santoku fairly frequently at home.

    Right now, I have 2 240mm gyutos, a 270 suji, a 165mm santoku, a 165mm nakiri ,a 150mm petty, and a bread knife and boning knife.

    If I could pick 3... I would pick 1 240mm gyuto (the thin one), the petty, and the suji ...but then I would feel I would need a lobster breaker knife, too.

  10. #10
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central Jersey
    Posts
    3,032
    Skip the Globals, skip the set. Just buy a decent 240mm gyuto, a 150mm petty, a parer and maybe tojiro itk bread knife.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •