Quantcast
Knives for tiny kitchens? - Page 2
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: Knives for tiny kitchens?

  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wales, UK
    Posts
    813
    For one knife I'd go with a Yoshikane 180mm petty, which has more weight and knuckle clearance than most, runs long and is a nice hybrid of slicer and small gyuto.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,163
    A simple and affordable solution would be a 180-190mm santoku and a 150mm petty for the tip work.

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    charlotte, nc
    Posts
    1,368
    small space, santoku without a doubt. short gyutos are not flat enough profile and things get tedious/annoying real fast when you have to do more than cut up a few items at a time. nakiri's i find useless as there is no tip.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,163
    Just to illustrate what Panda said: compare the third and fourth:

    http://www.misono-hamono.com/SWEDEN/santoku.html

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Taiwan
    Posts
    455
    Wow, got a better response than I was initially expecting. Thanks everyone so far.

    I've waffled a bit about the different directions I could take my "collection", given the limitations of my kitchen (which may change at some point) and the malleability of my cooking style (which hopefully will diversify a little more).

    I have an inexpensive small Chinese cleaver (165-170mm edge, 80mm height, Maestro Wu brand) and it is a reasonably OK knife for a lot of the prep I've done, and is a style that I am fairly accustomed to. Never cared for the bigger >200mm Chinese cleavers, and always had a sort of secret desire for a nakiri that would give me equal or better performance while not being quite as tall. I rarely do much point work, but that could well be due to adapting to the tool (cleaver) at hand. Thought about the Takeda with stainless cladding, or a Watanabe, or an Asai, or...or.... Waffling has prevented me from scratching that itch.

    However, instead of outright replacing the cleaver, I spent my first "real kitchen knife" money on a Sakai Yusuke 210mm gyuto. Honestly, my first impression was that while a very nice knife, it was a bit long and too light. However, it's since grown on me and I'm feeling more comfortable with it every day.

    Second "real knife" purchase was going to be a Harner stabber since I'm in line for one of his razors. Through the help of this forum, I was gently talked out of it, but Butch offered a 140mm "tall petty" with a flat gyuto-ish shape that got my attention (it's the bottom one in this post: http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...l=1#post248747 ). Tom sold it off to someone else, but Butch offered to make me one too.

    In the meantime, I signed up for a Delbert Ealy parer in his new style, which should satisfy any handheld tasks that the bigger knives are less ideal for.

    This so far leaves me with:
    Yusuke 210mm Stainless
    [maybe] Harner 140mm "tall petty"
    Maestro Wu 170mm cleaver
    Ealy new-style parer

    I have neglected the santoku, and part of that may be the mediocre reputation it has among gyuto folks. Not very fair, so I'm happy that some folks have posted that they use santoku.

    I admit I'm a bit blind when it comes to planning out my kitchen, so it's a real pleasure to see what solutions other people come up with, even if they do very different kinds of cooking.

    Thanks again.

  6. #16
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5,153
    As I drink my coffee at 4:40am, I'm seeing clearly...or I'm still sleeping. However, I just had a couple thoughts. You already have a great gyuto (yes, at that price, there still is great...nice buy!), and you have a good cleaver that you like, but aren't in love with. You're also in line for a parer that is known to be one of the best you can buy. Awesome! SOOO...why not try out a knife that has you intrigued, but you aren't too sure about? I still think a 150ish petty would be great, but you mentioned always wanting to wield a nakiri. The very best knife out there, for < $10 is the Kiwi Brand Nakiri (cleaver/veg knife). I still use mine pretty regularly, eve with the great knives I have at hand. It'll give you a try-out with the style of knife, and to be honest, you might just love it and keep it for a long time.
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

  7. #17
    Senior Member Seb's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    498
    What do you find is the best way to sharpen your Kiwis?

  8. #18
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    1,440
    I noticed this AM that Keiichi has posted a Special Thin white #2 210 Gyuto on ebay. I had this knife and if you're into thin knives, this knife will blow you away. I had one a few years ago and it still haunts me that I sold it. 1.) White #2 done by Yusuke takes an extraordinary keen, relative long lasting edge that is easy to refresh with just a strop. 2.) Although the knife is razor thin, 1.7 at the heel, the blade face is still ever so slightly convexed. I now have its big brother 240 Special Thin W#2 and its one of my most used blades when cutting thin really things: herbs, onions, peppers, shredding lettuce that kinda prep.

    Please note however, White #2 is reactive and will patina almost instantly and will be black if not wiped before and after use. Good news is that the patina is easy to remove with a rubber rust eraser.
    One thing you can give and still keep...is your word.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •