Page 1 of 11 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 105

Thread: De-Burring 101...again :)

  1. #1

    De-Burring 101...again :)

    I just finished an email marathon with an individual who was struggling with trying to grasp what de-burring is all about. This fellow had been reading many forums and blogs on this subject as well as perusing YouTube videos and had been completely jumbled up, confused, and somewhat mis-led by what he found.

    I thought I'd take just a second to get something straight on this subject, make a short post that hopefully will be read by people who want the true skinny on what really works for de-burring and what doesn't and why.


    Ok, first off we have two things to deal with as a consequence of sharpening....

    1. Burrs

    2. Wire Edge



    Common ways to de-burr....

    1. Strop



    What works for de-burring.....

    1. Stropping with a rough(ish) medium/substrate (such as leather) that provides physical drag/draw.
    The action provided from using a strop that offers draw is that the burrs are physically pulled away from and off of the edge.

    2. Running the edge through a material (that's not harmful to the edge) that offers some sideways grabbing action applied to the edge such as something that self heals. This action pulls burrs off of the edge from the lengthwise direction.



    What doesn't de-burr.....

    1. Newspaper, balsa, polishing stones, or anything smooth (even smooth leather).
    These items serve to either refine and/or align the wire edge and/or burrs. They will not remove burrs from an edge. The reason why they don't remove burrs is because they offer no physical drawing/pulling/grabbing action - they abrade slowly and align micro-teeth.



    How to remove a wire edge.....

    1. Abrasion
    Use finer and finer stones/strops/hones until the wire is so small that it becomes practically insignificant.



    This is just a small and very general outline of my thoughts on this subject. I hope that it helps to make things clearer for people.


    Dave
    Last edited by Dave Martell; 06-08-2011 at 12:50 AM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member mpukas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Gyptuckey, CO
    Posts
    801
    Nice post Dave.

    Can you define burr and wire edge and describe the difference between the two? Cheers! mpp

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Jay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Joisey
    Posts
    408


    The burr can be made to flop from side to side. That's a good sign that you're ready for the next stage of sharpening. I believe that flopping the burr from side to side fatigues it so much that it becomes very easy to remove it.

    Sometimes a burr can be very stubborn to remove.
    I really am related to Tony Clifton.

  4. #4
    Can you define burr and wire edge and describe the difference between the two? Cheers! mpp


    Traditionally burr and wire edge are used as one in the same thing and I wish we had come up with a different name altogether for what we call wire edges bu we didn't so we'll have to go on as if they're two separate things.

    These are my definitions, my way of thinking on this....

    Burrs = The little cling-on bits of steel that are left over ex-edge. These little bits of steel will be seen hanging on to the newly created fresh edge/wire edge glinting in the light often folded to one side of the knife.

    Wire Edge = A thin strip of steel found above the newly created cutting edge that is too weak to support a cutting edge. Like burrs, it is often folded to one side of the knife but unlike burrs it will not glint in the light.

  5. #5
    Anyway to tell the difference between a burr and a wire edge during sharpening? Or will you only realize you have had a wire edge after your edge doesn't last?
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    Anyway to tell the difference between a burr and a wire edge during sharpening? Or will you only realize you have had a wire edge after your edge doesn't last?

    The quick failing edge is a sure sign of a wire edge but it's also possible to detect it before this. If you haven't done the light stroke to align the wire type of stropping then it should be bent to one side of the blade. It can be only the slightest difference in feel between smooth and curled over so be critical with what you feel.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    4,214
    I hate to be the dissenter given that I've seen on the OP referred to as Yoda on more than one occasion BUT...
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    What works for de-burring...
    Should really read, "The easiest ways to de-burr..."
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    What doesn't de-burr...
    Should read, "It is more challenging to de-burr by..."
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    ...Newspaper, balsa, polishing stones, or anything smooth... ...they abrade slowly and align micro-teeth...
    These do, in fact, de-burr. A burr is the product of imperfect sharpening, among other things. More consistent sharpening will decrease the thickness of the metal attaching the burr to what is supposed to be the edge. For example, I generally can see and feel a bit of burr remaining after a 1k stone. I switch to a 5k stone and within a few passes, I generally have nearly no burr, as observed under 40X magnification. With a few passes on any 8k, I am pretty much burr-less. Then, I actually use the strop to do aligning, refining and taking care of the occasional bit of burr. If I have wire edge/burr issues for whatever reason (mainly sloppy), I will generally add a tiny microbevel to one or both sides of the edge. I've tried the newspaper, too. It works but only if your edge is pretty close to perfect. If your burr is attached by too much metal, of course, it will take forever (not fun but it still works).

    With regard to "fatiguing" the burr, I don't know for sure if that is a good thing to do. I would imagine that half of that fatigued metal ends up being your primary edge. For that reason, I try not to "flip the burr" for the sake of doing it. I try to get the burr to fall off from abrasion rather than fatigue. I've tried to see if I can "prove" this but I can't say I'm sure about this part.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    I hate to be the dissenter given that I've seen on the OP referred to as Yoda on more than one occasion BUT...

    How dare you disagree with ME!?!?

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Long island NY
    Posts
    1,034
    You pull off the burr so you can get to the wire edge as to abrade it into a finer edge. I got caught off gard recently by one of these things, but I'll save that story for another post.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    The quick failing edge is a sure sign of a wire edge but it's also possible to detect it before this. If you haven't done the light stroke to align the wire type of stropping then it should be bent to one side of the blade. It can be only the slightest difference in feel between smooth and curled over so be critical with what you feel.

    I have been sharpening in a style that is essentially "monkey see, monkey do". In this I manage to somehow get a nice sharp edge but I have no feel for the burr itself.

    In essence I've resigned to being burr blind as people are colour blind, or can I be shown the light??

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •