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Thread: sharpening angles

  1. #11
    Senior Member hobbitling's Avatar
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    So is there a guide for which angles to use for different steels/hardness, and different types of knives?

  2. #12
    Senior Member split0101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hobbitling View Post
    So is there a guide for which angles to use for different steels/hardness, and different types of knives?
    I don't think so. I looked around but could not find a complete reference. When I wanted to sharpen my Carter for the first time I looked around the forum to see how guys sharpen white #1.

    I think having a "general" guide/table would be very useful, especially to the novice/intermediate sharpener.

  3. #13
    Senior Member hobbitling's Avatar
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    for the math-phobic, use this. http://www.blocklayer.com/RiseRun.aspx

    enter the blade height as the "run"
    enter a sharpening angle.
    click "calculate"
    the "Rise" is the elevation of the spine of the blade above the stone, for that particular knife

    I think this calculator was designed for brick-laying, but numbers are numbers. It's all just trigonometry.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by split0101 View Post
    I don't think so. I looked around but could not find a complete reference. When I wanted to sharpen my Carter for the first time I looked around the forum to see how guys sharpen white #1.

    I think having a "general" guide/table would be very useful, especially to the novice/intermediate sharpener.

    I think this would be a massive case of false assurance though.

    The knife comes with a bevel, after you've used it for a bit have a look at it and think.

    How did the knife perform? Did it cut how you wanted it to?

    IF YES:
    maintain the same geometry, it's working

    IF NO:
    Were you getting too much wedging? If yes Thin it,
    Has the edge failed quickly from chipping / rolling? If yes increase the angle to give a more robust edge
    Did the edge not have enough bite? If yes drop back to lower grit for a few strokes once you have deburred to give a more toothy edge
    Do you want to see how far you can push the edge angle? If yes lower the angle and use it again, continue this reduce and use cycle until the edge fails too quickly and then increase it slightly back to the sweet spot.

    Etc,

    Follow a relative position of higher and lower angle from where it is now. The number doesn't matter

    There are too many other variables to give a specific angle, and that angle will always be what works for someone else not you. What do you cut, what's your cutting style,how much force do you apply, do you prefer edge retention for the sake of ultimate sharpness, or ultimate sharpness for the sake of retention, what knife is it, how was it heat treated, what's the geometry of the knife like. And on and on and on

  5. #15
    What TB_London says +3. There is no rule on the angle, there is to many factors why you might want to use higher or lower one.

    The rule of thumb is, if it is too chippy for you, raise the angle

  6. #16
    i am sharpening my ziganof i dont dare try on my carter yet.

    ill try the sharpie trick with 1cm and see how it goes i think the ziganof maybe vg 10 but its advertised as Damascus it has a slight chip in it and my knife has some small scratches on the side so i think my angle is too small for the ziganof should i take it back to the begining and start over with the angle?

    can i polish the scratches off the side i only ask because i did the secondary edge of one of my cheap supermarket knives and it would not polish up it was left with loads of scratches on the side even after i went up to a 10,000 grit whetstone.

    how do i get that chip out?

  7. #17
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    How large is that chip? A photo perhaps?

  8. #18
    i use to worry about angles as well, but its not necessary. The most important thing is to remain consistent from heel to tip. I would use the sharpie, to color in bevel in one color and the area above in another. that way you can see where your hitting. the lower the angle the higher up the blade face you will go. I would start higher than you think and go from there slowly checking often. once you are hitting where you want keep that angle and continue until you raise an even burr along the edge. Then flip and repeat.

    To remove burr, to heel to tip sweep of existing angle, then what we call stropping which is just reverse instead of edge leading you will do edge trailing strokes with very light pressure a few times. I like wood, felt, or cork to then slice through to remove any extra burr.

    A way to find the existing bevel that has help me is the put the knife on the stone, use your nail to flick the edge, if you hit it, your angle is too low, raise the knife up and its just about flush. so you nail will slide from the stone right onto the knife without a gap.

    You can also push the knife a bit, if it digs into the stone your slightly too high, back off a notch and thats your angle. Either way are fast and efficient.

  9. #19
    Never used a guide, never worried about an angle and have damn sharp knives. All it takes is a little practice. It's not rocket science.
    "Those who say it can't be done are always pasted by those doing it"

  10. #20
    daveb's Avatar
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    Depends on the distance from "edge" to "spine" and desired scary angle, presumably between 20 and 10 degrees.

    Chad Ward presents a simple discussion of angles, how to measure, etc in his "Edge in the Kitchen". He also has much of the same material on a web site (egullet?) that will provide good fundementals.

    That said, the posters above (esp TB) have provided the advanced course. It took awhile to sink in for me but I finally got that a consistent angle is much more important than a specific angle.
    Dave
    Older and wider.

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