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Thread: sharpening angles

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    How large is that chip? A photo perhaps?
    the chip is very slight you struggle to see it its very small but would like to remove it i doubt a photo would even show the chip

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by bahamaroot View Post
    Never used a guide, never worried about an angle and have damn sharp knives. All it takes is a little practice. It's not rocket science.
    lucky you i can get it sharpish but not as sharp as i would like

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Hbeernink View Post
    yup- sure can. if (t) is the angle where you want the blade to be sharpened, AB is the distance to raise the spine (from the surface of the stone), and BC is the height of the blade (heel to spine at each individual point along the blade - note that this will change as blades are not a constant height...), then:

    AB = BC * sin(t)
    thats a fine equation you have there bit too advanced for me though

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by stevenn21 View Post
    lucky you i can get it sharpish but not as sharp as i would like
    Give it a little time and practice and you will.
    "Those who say it can't be done are always pasted by those doing it"

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by jgraeff View Post
    i use to worry about angles as well, but its not necessary. The most important thing is to remain consistent from heel to tip. I would use the sharpie, to color in bevel in one color and the area above in another. that way you can see where your hitting. the lower the angle the higher up the blade face you will go. I would start higher than you think and go from there slowly checking often. once you are hitting where you want keep that angle and continue until you raise an even burr along the edge. Then flip and repeat.

    To remove burr, to heel to tip sweep of existing angle, then what we call stropping which is just reverse instead of edge leading you will do edge trailing strokes with very light pressure a few times. I like wood, felt, or cork to then slice through to remove any extra burr.

    A way to find the existing bevel that has help me is the put the knife on the stone, use your nail to flick the edge, if you hit it, your angle is too low, raise the knife up and its just about flush. so you nail will slide from the stone right onto the knife without a gap.

    You can also push the knife a bit, if it digs into the stone your slightly too high, back off a notch and thats your angle. Either way are fast and efficient.
    ill try it

  6. #26
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevenn21 View Post
    the chip is very slight you struggle to see it its very small but would like to remove it i doubt a photo would even show the chip
    Microchipping is very common with brand new blades. I guess it has to do with buffering in factory. You should get them out in one or a few sharpening sessions. No special action required unless you're a fanatic ceramic rod user. In that case full removal is imperative to avoid further damage and unnecessary material loss.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    As for the angles, I usually start as low as I can, raise the spine a bit until I end with a raised burr, then the same at the other side. The end result will be an edge of some 10 degree at the right side, and some 15 left.
    With some blades and some usage such an edge will need a microbevel.

  8. #28
    Senior Member split0101's Avatar
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    I guess I wanted to go with something more than trial and error. For example during my last sharpening session I decided to go about 10-12* on my shun. I was able to pop hairs and shred magazine paper with little effort. After about an hour of prep work on a poly board the edge was in horrible shape. It rolled on me, started to chip and overall looked like it was in a fight.

    Next time I will need to go back to 16-20* since that seems to hold up better. I don't know if that is because its a shun or if that's because VG10 should not be pushed that steep.

    At the same time I put the same angle on my Carter but it held up much better. I still need to put it through a proper prep session on that poly board. If it does hold up dthen I'll continue sharpening it at that angle.

    Next up is 51200, I'm going to go steep and see how it holds up. I have a feeling I might need to keep it in the mid-teens. Suggestions?

  9. #29
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    About your Shun: it has both to do with Shun and with the poly board.
    But in general I would avoid such drastic changes. I prefer finding a solution with microbevels rather than change the entire geometry and having to -- partially -- undo that again. It's a waste of material.

  10. #30
    Senior Member split0101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    About your Shun: it has both to do with Shun and with the poly board.
    But in general I would avoid such drastic changes. I prefer finding a solution with microbevels rather than change the entire geometry and having to -- partially -- undo that again. It's a waste of material.
    At the end of the day Im not to upset about it since this is a learning experience. Next time with my Shun Im going to go the micro bevel route since that should give me a more stable edge.

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