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What kind of work is a Bullnose butcher knife for?
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Thread: What kind of work is a Bullnose butcher knife for?

  1. #1
    Senior Member GeneH's Avatar
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    What kind of work is a Bullnose butcher knife for?

    I have an Old Hickory bullnose butcher knife but rarely use it. (We hammered it (wood batan) through a small Aspen for a walking stick. No damage all to the knife. Amazing. Howerver the wide nose seems unwieldy for most kitchen chores. Worked ok when we butchered our deer last year, but not ideal. Can you folks give me some examples of how / where that style is used?

    (zero points for "butchering." just sayin.... )

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    Senior Member ChuckTheButcher's Avatar
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    It is used for slice through large boneless primals or smaller ones for trimming primals.
    All normal people love meat. If I went to a barbeque and there was no meat, I would say 'Yo Goober! Where's the meat?'.- Homer Simpson

  3. #3
    As Chuck said they were basically used for breaking down and trimming primals, as were most bullnose butchers back in the day.
    "Those who say it can't be done are always pasted by those doing it"

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    Senior Member GeneH's Avatar
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    Primals - the large areas of different parts of the animal, cut off the bones, and being made into less large pieces, ready for the grocery store to make steaks, roasts, etc from?

    I checked some videos about butchering, and they seemed to use more pointy knives taking the large slabs of meat off the carcass. Can you describe what the shape of the bullnose was supposed to do?

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    Senior Member Dardeau's Avatar
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    The bulbous tip gives a knife more length on the edge for longer, cleaner cuts. I also find the shape useful for skinning hams, the tip can follow the curve and the rest of the length lifts the skin. That said, I haven't used mine since I last broke a pig six months ago. It's a pretty specialized thing.


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  6. #6
    Senior Member ChuckTheButcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneH View Post
    Primals - the large areas of different parts of the animal, cut off the bones, and being made into less large pieces, ready for the grocery store to make steaks, roasts, etc from?

    I checked some videos about butchering, and they seemed to use more pointy knives taking the large slabs of meat off the carcass. Can you describe what the shape of the bullnose was supposed to do?
    Kind of. Your primals for beef are chuck, rib, loin, and round. Sub primals are things like chuck roll, rib roast, top sirloin, eye round.
    All normal people love meat. If I went to a barbeque and there was no meat, I would say 'Yo Goober! Where's the meat?'.- Homer Simpson

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    Senior Member ChuckTheButcher's Avatar
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    Yes it is also good for skinning. Most skinning knives are extremely upswept bullnoses.
    All normal people love meat. If I went to a barbeque and there was no meat, I would say 'Yo Goober! Where's the meat?'.- Homer Simpson

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    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    It's more forgiving to lead with than a pointy slicer/scimitar. And the added weight on the front end gives you more power/control when doing large cuts.
    The AI does not love you, nor does it hate you, but you are made out of atoms it might find useful for something else. - Eliezer Yudkowsky

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    Senior Member GeneH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brainsausage View Post
    It's more forgiving to lead with than a pointy slicer/scimitar.
    Does that mean a common technique for butchers (in the context of this thread) start with push cutting of those large pieces? So the wider bullnose helps control knife sort of like a keel or steerer of some sort?

    I can see how the longer rounded edge would help with skinning, and be somewhat specialized, which explains why I don't use it much. Seems too massive for what little I do here at home. When we hunt Whitetail deer, we don't need much of a skinning knife, especially when we get the smaller ones (better venison and easier to get out of the woods ). It's easy enough once started to just pull the skin off the carcass, rolling it as we go for both leverage and keeping the hair off the meat. I think the last time I used my butcher knife was 2 years ago, breaking the large parts of the deer down.

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    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    I use an old Case bullnose to french airline breasts...but I think it's mainly due to it being tough as nails...
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