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Thread: A thinner's toolkit

  1. #1

    A thinner's toolkit

    I need some suggestions for filling out the bottom end of my sharpening kit. I have most of the Chosera stones starting at 400 grit. I wore out a 120x diamond plate thinning out my Takeda and I find that the 400 stone takes quite a long time to get the scratches out. I am specifically interested in how ultra-low grit stones compare to diamond stones. I'd also be interested in what might be a good transition between an ultra-low grit and my 400.

  2. #2
    They make 220 diamond plates that would be a good step between a 120 and 400
    "Sucking at something is the first step to becoming sorta good at something." -Jake the Dog

  3. #3
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    What diamond plate did you have? I've thinned quite a few on my atoma and it's still going strong. Soft steel (like cladding) may actually wear some diamond plates faster as it's the diamonds getting pulled out by the soft, gummy steel that wears it; not the diamonds wearing down.

    Light(er) pressure is also your friend with diamond plate as they don't need much force to cut and beyond a certain point all you're doing is wearing the plate more.

    Jon at JKI mentioned something about potentially getting some diamond STONES which I'm assuming would have the diamond grit incorporated into the synthetic stone material. They sound pretty interesting to me.
    "I gotta tell ya, this is pretty terrific. Ha hahaha, YEAH!" - Moe (w/ 2 knives). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVt4U...layer_embedded

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    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    What kind of blades are being involved?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin0505 View Post
    What diamond plate did you have? I've thinned quite a few on my atoma and it's still going strong. Soft steel (like cladding) may actually wear some diamond plates faster as it's the diamonds getting pulled out by the soft, gummy steel that wears it; not the diamonds wearing down.

    Light(er) pressure is also your friend with diamond plate as they don't need much force to cut and beyond a certain point all you're doing is wearing the plate more.

    Jon at JKI mentioned something about potentially getting some diamond STONES which I'm assuming would have the diamond grit incorporated into the synthetic stone material. They sound pretty interesting to me.
    I don't recall. To be fair I have been using it to flatten my stones for the last few years. The thin job definitely knocked it down a few notches though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    What kind of blades are being involved?
    Anything from virgin Shirogami #2 to clad Aogami Super. In the short term I'm thinning an old white #2 nakiri to give to a friend for Xmas.

    Still curious if anyone has an opinion on whether there are trade offs between low grit stones and course diamond plates.

  6. #6
    Low grit stones generally dish quickly and wear out faster.
    Diamond plates generally leave deeper scratches. Light pressure helps some but adds to working time.
    "Those who say it can't be done are always pasted by those doing it"

  7. #7
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    shapton pro 320 works well to remove scratches from a dmt xc which is 220, not sure about the xxc 140.

  8. #8
    WillC's Avatar
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    I would recommend a 3 set of diamond stones, I use 150/300/800. Aint nothing like a diamond stone to get diamond stone marks out, then go to a really fast cutting soft 600-1000 grit. I have a sigma 1000 designed to work hard steel, its soft and dishy and the feel is horrid for sharpening but it cuts like a beast.
    I have the cheaper slightly smaller iwood stones and so far they have outlasted my dead atoma. You shouldn't need to press hard with diamond stones, and until they wear in you get the odd extra deep mark which is a pain to get out.

  9. #9
    WillC, are you referring to the sigma select II or the sigma ceramic 'soft'? They both seems to be advertised as having superior cutting speed.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bahamaroot View Post
    Low grit stones generally dish quickly and wear out faster.
    Diamond plates generally leave deeper scratches. Light pressure helps some but adds to working time.
    Ever tried coarse sandpaper?

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