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Thread: WTB: Vintage Oyster Knife(s)

  1. #11
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    So this is the knife I selected:

    http://www.knifemerchant.com/product.asp?productID=7959

    Hopefully it works out. From what I understand, I'll be doing mostly East Coast Oysters.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Nmko's Avatar
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    Bubinga and brass looks nice, Great choice!

  3. #13
    Senior Member smilesenpai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jai View Post
    i shuck thousands per week when i was on that specific section and we honestly use teatowels and they are basicly more for support because of the way you roll them. if you need a glove you are doing something very wrong you use almost no pressure to shuck oysters its all about finding the hinge and giving it a slight twist and using leverage. we have up to 20 varieties on our menu at a time. and even with the harder oysters you dont use pressure. alot of new guys use alot of pressure and they end up stabbing themselves and the oysters. if i see one stab or mutilation it goes in the bin... time and technique are important.
    Where are you working at? I am planning to visit Syd end of the year.

    What is your shucker of choice?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by DitmasPork View Post
    Very happy with my R. Murphy New Haven oyster knife. The design of the wooden handle and carbon blade hasn't changed for many years, and their inexpensive at $14—just get one and get it dirty with a nice patina.

    Bloodroot Blades makes some gorgeous oyster knives, but they are price—too rich for my blood.

    Never heard of those guys before, I just checked out their site nice looking knives. The way the page is written, reads like it's one of us writing it, anyone know if the makers hang out here?

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jai View Post
    i shuck thousands per week when i was on that specific section and we honestly use teatowels and they are basicly more for support because of the way you roll them. if you need a glove you are doing something very wrong you use almost no pressure to shuck oysters its all about finding the hinge and giving it a slight twist and using leverage. we have up to 20 varieties on our menu at a time. and even with the harder oysters you dont use pressure. alot of new guys use alot of pressure and they end up stabbing themselves and the oysters. if i see one stab or mutilation it goes in the bin... time and technique are important.
    Sad to say but Some places will make you wear one. I don't use one that either but I also find it faster and easier to open them in my palm rather than using a bench, that way I can leverage with both hands

  6. #16
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    i have nightmares opening oysters. i have the scars to prove it. i actually had to to to the ER and the doc sewing me up sent me to a buddy who gave me a lesson. DUMB! i had crap insurance too, so it cost me alot.

    i now use the cheap generic white handled knife i got from a local oyster farm. i hate it.

    i remember the guy teaching me told me to get a New Haven style oyster knife. it has a thinner tip and it is curved. this thread has motivated me to buy one. probably get the cheap victorinox one.

    oyster season is here in the bay area.!! gotta get off my ass.

  7. #17
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    How bout these guys I picked up recently?

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    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  8. #18
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    they look wicked, how much were they rick ?

  9. #19
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    Damn I hadn't checked this thread in a minute and didn't realize Rick and Niloc had posted in it. I came here to show this, which happened tonight (roughly two weeks after open):



    It was the other guy on raw bar using my knife, not me, but with our inexperience, I can't say it couldn't have happened to me. We have been shucking wild-caught Blue Points. It seems as if the majority of them require a lot of work just to get to the sweet spot. Is this normal? When the path is clear I can do it in under ten seconds, when it's not, I seem to be trying to knock off a lot of barnicles. One of our prep cooks tries to scrub them, but he's new at it too.

    Any tips? Niloc any chance you're finally willing to sell me one of your vintages? Rick can you tell me where you got yours?

  10. #20
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    The antique ones can be hit or miss, I have broken many myself. Most of them were made by the men that opened oysters for a living (and a horrible living at that) so not exactly expert's at heat treating.
    antique ones are great but I use the ones made by Cummings at work, they don't brake. The two sights above have some really nice knives like try out my self.

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