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blade geometry, game changer?
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Thread: blade geometry, game changer?

  1. #1
    Senior Member aaamax's Avatar
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    blade geometry, game changer?

    Can someone explain how/why the geometry of a knife can so dramatically effect the cutting action? Is weight one of the more deciding factors? To really drive the point home I cut an apple and then a tomato with a 120 petty, 240 cleaver, 270 gyuto.
    What a trip.
    Thanks in advanced.
    Long live Carbon!!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    I believe you're referring to the blade's profile rather than to its geometry as this is used amongst knife nuts. Most people here use the term geometry exclusively to describe the blade's cross section.

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    I think he is referring to the cross-sectional geometry. And as for the example, I guess it would depend on which 120 petty, 240 cleaver and 270 gyuto....

    Think of it like this. The more obtuse the angle, the more like a wood axe a knife becomes, so a lot more force is needed to cut because of the wedging effect on food. If your knife is very thin, the wedging effect is minimized and therefore less force is needed. After this you can realize that although a paper thin knife would be very sharp, it wouldn't be very durable, so in comes durability to give us the balance of the knife world. Later many knife people realize, it's not much important the thickness of the knife at the spine, but rather just behind the edge for 1cm or so. This is why (IMO) some knives seem to cut so well compared to another knife that looks similar but doesn't (assuming both knives are heat-treated well and sharpened well).

    Overall, try a lot of knives, and keep the ones you like best...there's so many variables that sometimes you can't even explain what makes a knife amazing.

  4. #4
    Senior Member aaamax's Avatar
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    Thanks Droshi.
    The super-thin petty in the tomato takes what seems like more ft/lb pressure than what the gyuto has in weight. Otherwise I would just think it is because of the size/depth of what's being cut. I.e, a greenbean because it's so thin, you don't have time to notice the difference... maybe... ?? The difference being? (Hell, I need a drink, this is making my head spin)
    In general, the hand feels something and the brain is trying to figure it out.
    The bloody mystery of good steel... gotta luv it.
    Long live Carbon!!

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