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Gesshin Heiji or Kato Work Horse - Page 3
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Thread: Gesshin Heiji or Kato Work Horse

  1. #21
    Senior Member bkultra's Avatar
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    I should have been more clear. When I said it would be harder to thin, I was not speaking of in terms of time. I do agree soft iron would be faster to thin then stainless steel. What I meant was it would be harder to maintain the original geometry (again I could be wrong). I also assume it would require thining more often.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    I haven't used a Heji, but they've been on my radar for awhile.

    From what I've read, it's likely that both need some thinning before reaching their full potential.

    Both Kato's that I've used needed quite a bit of thinning, and I'd agree with Chuckle's sentiment that thinning a blended convex grind like a Kato is a bit trickier to figure out than knives with an obvious bevel like a Heji.

    I've heard good things about the steel in the Hejis, but I must say that the 2 Kato's that I've sharpened where almost OVER hard. The steel felt more like glass than metal. Getting an aggressive and functionally sharp edge was moderately easy, but getting a crazy sharp or more refined edge was perhaps the most difficult of any steel I've sharpened (stainless included).
    "I gotta tell ya, this is pretty terrific. Ha hahaha, YEAH!" - Moe (w/ 2 knives). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVt4U...layer_embedded

  3. #23
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuckles View Post
    I think the Kato would be easier to thin in terms of time. Heiji makes it clear how far up the thinning has to go. With The Kato as soon as you can get over how far up the blade the scratches need to extend when thinning it becomes pretty straight forward because the grind is very consistent along the entire blade face.


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  4. #24
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    Me, too. I've never tried a Heiji, and might have bought one if I hadn't been warned off of it somewhat. I do have a Kato, however. It's a JNS Kato gyuto 'Workhorse' as distinct from other Kato gyuto, such as those which if you really try are possible to find in Japan. Anyway, it's my fav gyuto. Agreed that, though you need to attend to the bevels, get a good feel for and preserve the geometry, it's not really hard at all. I suppose a well-made knife more or less indicates to the sharpener how to go about things. Yes, the steel is hard, but for me not hard to sharpen or to get a useful edge with teeth. The knive doesn't come with a saya, which is a drawback to me, for me it's a knife I never question when I pick it up. And, oh, as for reactivity I don't find it to be very reactive anywhere, just as a workhorse should, and just gradual, natural patina in my case.

  5. #25
    Senior Member quantumcloud509's Avatar
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    Id go with Kato. Wait a second...I DID go with Kato. Not because I dont like Heiji, Ive never tried them, but when I went with Kato "Workhorse", and even though the handle/tang area looked like @$$, I have been having a very difficult time putting my "Workhorse" down. Edge retention is great, sharpening is easy...a little tougher than a Takeda perse but easy. Reactivity is not like AS, and I am still getting used to how and when the tomagahane steel reacts, but its quick and small rust spots. Im really angry at myself right now for using green scrubber pad to clean the knife the other night in drunker stuppor, but wet sanding is in the future as Workhorse has some vertical lines Id like to smooth out. The drawbacks are honestly so minute that they just dont matter. The feel of the knife with its comfortable burnt chestnut handle, and its proper heft give the knife a perfect dimension of spiritual like balance. Zen you might call it. Its true. Cutting with Kato is one of the more pure experiences I have yet to have with a knife. Oh and a bout a saya...if thats really whats holding you back from purchasing a Workhorse, Im sure we can figure that out real quick like...
    Amat Victoria Curam Fortune favors the prepared.
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  6. #26
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin0505 View Post
    From what I've read, it's likely that both need some thinning before reaching their full potential.
    Whoever wrote that is full of it. I've owned two brand new Heijis, one direct from Nakaya-san and one from Jon, and the only knives that have cut better, out of the box or not out of the box, than the Heijis have been Kagekiyos, and I've tried and owned a lot of knives (though not a non-deformed Kato, admittedly).

  7. #27
    Senior Member quantumcloud509's Avatar
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    Name:  ImageUploadedByKitchen Knife Forum1385155744.021195.jpg
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    Amat Victoria Curam Fortune favors the prepared.
    "A human being is primarily a bag for putting food into." -George Orwell

  8. #28
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    okay. the kato that we are all talking about is the kato workhorse series. generally speaking many people assume any knife that is commonly referred to as a "workhorse" could be suitable for rough work. i would like to warn any potential buyer that unless you use some microbevels, Kato will definitely get chips if you decide to work rough with it. simply because its a big thick knife, doesnt necessarily mean it can take a beating.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    I've owned two brand new Heijis, one direct from Nakaya-san and one from Jon
    I think this thread is about Gesshin Heiji, but would you recommend getting one direct? Can't be that different, you're cutting out the middle-man, and it's cheaper I believe, right?

  10. #30
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Asteger View Post
    I think this thread is about Gesshin Heiji, but would you recommend getting one direct? Can't be that different, you're cutting out the middle-man, and it's cheaper I believe, right?
    They are pretty different knives, in the details, and the F&F on mine isn't as nice as Gesshin. There is apparently more variance on the knives, direct, but I got lucky and got a really nice one. Buying a Gesshin from Jon, you are assured to get a good one.

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