Quantcast
did you use a Victorinox Wide Blade?
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: did you use a Victorinox Wide Blade?

  1. #1

    did you use a Victorinox Wide Blade?

    did you use a Victorinox Wide Blade 8 inches? Knifehttp://www.nisbets.co.uk/Victorinox-Cooks-Knife-Wide-Blade/C662/ProductDetail.raction is that good? what's the difference between the Victorinox Wide Blade knife and the classic 8 inches Victorinox Cooks ?

    I like the wide blade because I fell the knife more "safty" and stable when the blade is sliding on my fingers (my hands and my fingers are bigger than the average).

    I'm a pizza maker, and I sort out so much: peppers, mushrooms, pepperoni, tomatoes, courgettes, potatoes, mozzarellas, garlic, aubergines, and other ingredients of medium or little dimension; I think who for me a Victorinox cooks knife of 10 or 12 are too long, and it isn't smart to buy those just because there are more wide. what do you think?

    anyway, what's the best sharpening steel if I buy a fibrox Victorinox knife? a friend of mine say who I need to buy a "Dick Diamond Blade Steel". but costs the double of a fibrox Victorinox knife; isn't it a waste?

    thank you

  2. #2
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Clayton, NC- surrounded by lots of trees
    Posts
    2,089
    Yo! And welcome...F. Dick makes very nice steels. A diamond steel in general will actually sharpen/ remove metal. It will keep a Forschner very toothy, at the cost of slowly wearing away the metal. A ceramic rod will hone the edge/ keep it aligned, and some will actually remove a small amount of metal. I would suggest a ceramic rod, such as an Idahone or DMT, which can be had for around $30.
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

  3. #3
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,163
    A wide blade like this one -- just as a santoku -- is very convenient with vegetables. For the mozzarella though I would choose a very narrow one because of the dragging.

  4. #4
    Senior Member ChuckTheButcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Arlington Virginia
    Posts
    615
    +1 with F. Dick. My all time favorite steel that just about every butcher I know uses is this. http://www.knifemerchant.com/product.asp?productID=1403. I love this steel.
    All normal people love meat. If I went to a barbeque and there was no meat, I would say 'Yo Goober! Where's the meat?'.- Homer Simpson

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by NO ChoP! View Post
    Yo! And welcome...F. Dick makes very nice steels. A diamond steel in general will actually sharpen/ remove metal. It will keep a Forschner very toothy, at the cost of slowly wearing away the metal. A ceramic rod will hone the edge/ keep it aligned, and some will actually remove a small amount of metal. I would suggest a ceramic rod, such as an Idahone or DMT, which can be had for around $30.
    +1
    "Those who say it can't be done are always pasted by those doing it"

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Hawaii
    Posts
    1,370
    Don't think of a steel as a sharpening tool,Even for Forschners using a diamond steel only eventually the blade will not cut well at all.I like the F-Dick polishing steel to realine the edge.To sharpen get a whetstone & learn to freehand.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,163
    Most of the Dicks were developed in a time without ceramic alternatives. Now, I feel they are both outdated and overpriced. And they were meant to maintain very soft stainless steel.
    With fine ceramic rods or waterstones maintaining has become much easier since.

  8. #8

    thank you

    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    Most of the Dicks were developed in a time without ceramic alternatives. Now, I feel they are both outdated and overpriced. And they were meant to maintain very soft stainless steel.
    With fine ceramic rods or waterstones maintaining has become much easier since.
    what are fine ceramic rods or waterstones good for me? I mean: what's the right model?

    is it better a ceramic rods or waterstones? I think who it's better a ceramic rods just because is easy to use...



    thank you

  9. #9
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,163
    IKEA seems to have a good ceramic rod for some €10. Never used it myself, but it's quite common in Europe for maintaining soft stainless like the Victorinox.
    But a rod is useful only for maintaining between stone sharpening sessions when using a stone is inconvenient, e.g. in a pro environment. A home user may better maintain the edge by stropping on a medium fine or fine stone.
    A rod is no replacement for a stone. Even with a relatively coarse one, you don't want to abrade steel with it. If improperly used it creates terrible wire edges as the steel debris doesn't get evacuated as with a waterstone and gets accumulated. Just as with a common steel.
    Sharpening soft stainless isn't very simple. Deburring is quite difficult to get mastered.
    I would use a J400-800 for sharpening, and a J2000 for stropping and deburring only. A fine ceramic rod like the Black MAC may be used for deburring instead, but that requires some finesse.
    In Europe you may get the Naniwas and Choseras at a good price with
    edenwebshops.com

  10. #10
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,163
    For the basics, excerpts from Chad Ward's An Edge in the Kitchen:

    http://forums.egullet.org/topic/2603...nd-sharpening/

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •