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Thread: S-Grind etc... why not a diamond shape grind?

  1. #1
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    S-Grind etc... why not a diamond shape grind?

    If one wanted food release and stiction properties similar to a narrow slicer ... why would it not make sense to grind, say, the 1st third of the blade (seen from the edge) just like a thin slicer, just thick enough not to wedge like hell but give some ploughing action, and let the steel get slightly thinner again towards the spine - making the back part of the blade work as a stiffener and force transfer element without interfering much with the food?

    EDIT: Think that kind of design was even found suitable for preparation of whole knight in the past?

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    I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.

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    Referring to a rhombic grind I think. It's used some in puukkos. Works well but on a kitchen knife I think you may end up with a too light, flexible blade.

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    If the drawing in the custom gyuto thread is to scale... yep, almost what I meant, just without going thicker again towards spine ... but that is probably the compromise needed for avoiding that flexibility....

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    It doesn't really represent what my knives look like these days, but yes the early ones. I leave them a little thicker in the thinnest point in the hollow section now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RDalman View Post
    It doesn't really represent what my knives look like these days, but yes the early ones. I leave them a little thicker in the thinnest point in the hollow section now.
    May I ask why? Was it too flexible?

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    Some of the thinnest ones was able to flex in "the wrong way with alot of force yes, and that wasn't very" condfidence giving". A few mentioned, but I don't think anyone have complained directly or wanting to return their knives or such. Mostly it's about retaining more weight in the blades, functionally they don't need to be suuuper thin there.

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    Senior Member Badgertooth's Avatar
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    I think some of the Konosuke Fujiyamas have what's referred to as a rhomboidal grind

    *rummages on interwebs*

    This series of knife is forged with a wide kiriba primary bevel and a very slighlty rhomboidal grind, the center of the knife is slightly wider than the spine. This allows for very good food release, there can be a slightly increased wedging in large thick vegetables (think dense red cabbage).

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    Senior Member Badgertooth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RDalman View Post
    Referring to a rhombic grind I think. It's used some in puukkos. Works well but on a kitchen knife I think you may end up with a too light, flexible blade.
    Ah.. Oops, beat me to it. But my Togo Reigou is ground like that and there is nothing dainty about it.

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    I wonder if you actually would get much extra benefit from a rhombic geometry... I would imagine that if you had a relative flat grind in the top half of the blade meeting a reasonable angle (in comparison) for a wide bevel it would serve much the same effect, except with your soft foods what will just stick to anything anyway.

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