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Thread: The Gyuto Plunge

  1. #11
    Senior Member ChuckTheButcher's Avatar
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    I'd stay clear from the kansui dojo and tojiro dp. Hattori and Masamoto vg are both good knives. I am not the biggest fan of vg-10 stainless but that is just a personal preference. It is a good steel especially for the home cook. I've never used the Ryusen Blazen but powdered stainless steels are are very good if done right. I don't like the misono ux10 at all but a lot of people do. I still think the hiromoto is better than all of them and a better price.
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  2. #12
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eighteesix View Post
    What do you mean by spruced up? Example?

    Where would I find the AS for purchase?

    Also, I don't see that Hiromoto makes any petty sized knives. Any recommendation there?
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  3. #13
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    hattori's VG10 is hands down the best heat treat of VG10 anywhere. which says a lot about their knife line (HD). really good stuff. so if there's anything to say about Ryusen's Blazen which are also the same people that does the heat treating for hattori's vg10 line, their powdered stainless should be pretty darn good as well.

    =D

  4. #14
    Senior Member ChuckTheButcher's Avatar
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    That's good to know. I didn't realize ryusen uses the same people.
    All normal people love meat. If I went to a barbeque and there was no meat, I would say 'Yo Goober! Where's the meat?'.- Homer Simpson

  5. #15
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    Dojo used to be a better value. Its easier to except imperfections at $40 than the current $70. It's still stainless clad AS steel, though...
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  6. #16
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eighteesix View Post
    after revisiting JCK i noticed hiromoto does in fact have petty knives. does it makes sense to also get a petty knife in carbon (the matching one)? or stainless? different brand?

    i see some of these are well recommended:
    Kansui Dojo
    Hattori FH Item# FH-3
    Misono UX10Ryusen Blazen
    Masamoto VG
    Tojiro DP
    It makes sense to have a stainless petty if your gyuto is a carbon. From time to time you will have to deal will acidic fruit and other stuff you don't want to dull your carbon edge.
    As a petty will always get some abuse, and has only a small contact area with the board, it will get sharpened quite often and wear out relatively fast. I wouldn't pay more than some $80 for a basic one. I use myself mainly a G3, boring but effective.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    It makes sense to have a stainless petty if your gyuto is a carbon. From time to time you will have to deal will acidic fruit and other stuff you don't want to dull your carbon edge.
    As a petty will always get some abuse, and has only a small contact area with the board, it will get sharpened quite often and wear out relatively fast. I wouldn't pay more than some $80 for a basic one. I use myself mainly a G3, boring but effective.
    I assumed as much. Definitely effective.

    However, this brings up another issue. I originally had counted out a carbon knife not because of upkeep/maintenance but because I wanted one knife to do almost everything with. I understand there's acidic fruit that should be avoided (and other things), but is there a specific list items that are too acidic or things I should avoid with a carbon knife?

  8. #18
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Depends somewhat on the carbon. Aogami Super e.g. is poorly reactive -- contains some chromium.
    If you've tons of sweet peppers to cut and you do have a stainless I would suggest to take the stainless. The combination of a hard skin and highly acidic content will dull your carbon blade somewhat -- your stainless as well, by the way, but at a lesser degree.
    In general though if you wipe the edge in time, yes, in time, there's no problem. Just as one should do with a stainless as well...

  9. #19
    Senior Member ChuckTheButcher's Avatar
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    That does make since with a petty. I will say that with the clad knives a patina often looks nice. On straight up carbon blades not so much. It gives a contrast to the jigne and hagne. That's not saying you want to let them rust or corrode. It not that hard to wipe a knife off and you can always rub it with a cleaner like fitz for 30 secs.
    All normal people love meat. If I went to a barbeque and there was no meat, I would say 'Yo Goober! Where's the meat?'.- Homer Simpson

  10. #20
    hmm that's a bit concerning. I eat a lot of peppers and tomatoes. I do not have a quality stainless as backup--the one I do have has been a workhorse for 7 years and has seen it's last days.

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