Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15

Thread: Looking for Sharp Knives

  1. #11
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Clayton, NC- surrounded by lots of trees
    Posts
    2,084
    Get yourself a white #2 laser. Konosuke; Sakai Yusuke; Gesshin Ginga, etc...., and a couple of stones. The ho wood handles are surprisingly tough, and can always be replaced/ upgraded.

    Ultimate "sharpness".

    Ease of sharpen-ability.

    The mono carbon is reactive, but pretty resilient; will teach you how to maintain a knife.

    You'll be amazed at the atom splitting capabilities...
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

  2. #12
    If you wanna a laser, get sakai yusuke, but they are always out of stock, the same as shigefusa kasumi, which is a good heavy workhorse.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,244
    Coming from the Henckels, and to understand the geometry of Japanese blades, you better start with a relatively unexpensive middle of the road gyuto like the FKH rather than with a laser.

  4. #14
    Thank you Kartman35 for the explanation video.

    Looks like the general consensus is to start with a FKH so I'll pick one of those up first and then move to something like the Gesshin Ginga White#2 after a while.

    It sounds like I should buy good stone(s) out the gate, if I just get the 1000/6000 from JKI will that be enough or should I be looking at something else? Would you reocommend getting a diamond flattening plate at the same time or wait until I need it (really not sure how long it is until one is required).

  5. #15
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,244
    Most new stones do need some flattening, for two reasons: the first, obvious, is that they are rarely flat, and the corners will need some care; second, the outside layer of the stones should be removed to free the active particles. See it as an inactive crust.
    But you may perform this initial flattening with a sheet of coarse sandpaper as well.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •