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Kiritsuke shaped Wa-Gyuto vs normal Wa-Gyuto
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Thread: Kiritsuke shaped Wa-Gyuto vs normal Wa-Gyuto

  1. #1
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    Kiritsuke shaped Wa-Gyuto vs normal Wa-Gyuto

    I've never used a kiritsuke shaped Wa-Gyuto before. Just wondering if it has any benefits from a normal shaped Wa-Gyuto? If not any advantages what aspects appeal to people?

    Thanks all

  2. #2
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    They typically have a flatter profile. Great if you exclusively slice or push cut. If you rock chop, stick with a regular gyuto.

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    Bamin, The Kiri gyutos look awesome but in my experience with the Kono HD 240, its just an akward knife to use for prep work. Slicing is a dream. Plus the Kiri tip is usually a few mm lower than on a same sized Gyuto so you have to be careful about not damaging the tip. Kinda one of those heart-break knives. beautiful, great steel, awesome grind. It wa actually my first non-single J-Knive. Killed me to sell it but I'm not interested in collecting knives that i don't use. people have given me advise in the past that i did not believe. First is to stay away from double bevel Kiri tiped knives and stay away from single bevel knives unless perparing Japanese food. Wasted a lot of dough on a Usuba and Yanagiba. Still have a Deba for sentimental reason but she's just wall art these days too.
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  4. #4
    Only two advantages that I can think of: looks, and more flat edge length for push-cutting.

    In a gyuto-sized knife, in most cases it's the looks that draws people in. However, in some cases where the maker's gyutos tend to have too much belly or the curvature starts too "early", the kiri-gyuto might be worth considering.
    Len

  5. #5
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    A misconception or fallacy, is that more traditional shaped Japanese knifes can be used in the same way as their western counter part. A person comfortable with chef knife can comfortably transition to a gyuto, with a few adjustments. Since the performance between a western chef knife and a gyuto is fairly significant, people are looking to get the same performance boost out of other knifes. After the gyuto, Japanese knifes become more specialized and intended for a specific task.

    A common knife to try out, is the honesuki, a knife designed to break down and debone chicken. Use it as a western boning knife, and people are disappointed. It's okay with chicken, but not so good with other types of protein. The western boning knife is a better general purpose knife. Use the honesuki to break down chicken, in an Asian style, and the knife design becomes apparent.

    The single bevel kiritsuke was designed to combine a usuba with a yanagiba. While the double beveled kiritsuke is indirectly related to a nakiri and sujihiki. The strength of the knife is push cutting and slicing. Since I prefer a cleaver/nakiri, the knife is a good fit for my style. It is a surprisingly good slicer, which is a bonus.

    The tip is good at scoring proteins and is acceptable for doing tip work. Where it would give me pause is speed chopping onions. Throwing around a knife with a low tip is asking for trouble. At a slower pace the tip glides through onions.

    The more experience I get with knifes, I'm finding that I prefer a knife with a thicker spine. The extra weight helps with accuracy. A heavier knife feels more stable in the hand, and its easy feel how far it has moved. A lighter knife might move farther then intended.

    A gyuto is the more versatile knife. If the strengths of a kiritsuke fits your style, then it might be worth checking out. I'd try a nakiri or cleaver first though.

    Jay
    I'm a over-sized, under-educated, two onions a month, cutting fool.

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    Jay,
    One thing you can give and still keep...is your word.

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    Thanks for all the input guys. Basically, I'm thinking about getting a Gesshin Kagekiyo in blue 1, since I have plenty of gyutos, I was thinking of trying out a kiritsuke shaped one.

  8. #8
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    Jacob EDIPUREeks Shs that one (he actually has two), if there was a good one to try, that might be it. Please post so we can drool. I'm still not down with the shape. Their not great push cutters next to a nakiri, usuba, cleavers. Look cool though thats for sure. There are multiple shapes of Kiri tips too. I bet that Kag. is different than the Kono, than a Don Nugen.
    One thing you can give and still keep...is your word.

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