Quantcast
Black Nargusta Burl Question - Page 2
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21

Thread: Black Nargusta Burl Question

  1. #11
    Senior Member Sam Cro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Hills Of Tennessee
    Posts
    127
    Stable is the best ! However you as a burl dealer should know this as it is always best to stabilize unless it is a Natural hard,dense and stable wood . Just my .02 worth .

    Sam

  2. #12
    Sponsors Dream Burls's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    1,210
    Thanks for getting this thread back on track Sam. I do know that. I also know it costs money and takes a lot more time to finish stabilized blocks, but they will be going to K&G. Thanks for the input everyone. And I got to learn what a BOP is.
    Please visit my store at www.dreamburls.com Imagine the possibilities!
    Email me at service@dreamburls.com
    Visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/dream.burls
    All sales are backed with a no questions asked money back guarantee.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    1,365
    Sorry about getting off topic

  4. #14
    Sponsors Dream Burls's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    1,210
    Quote Originally Posted by mhenry View Post
    Sorry about getting off topic
    No problem. In fact, I started the diversion with asking you about the oil rig.
    Please visit my store at www.dreamburls.com Imagine the possibilities!
    Email me at service@dreamburls.com
    Visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/dream.burls
    All sales are backed with a no questions asked money back guarantee.

  5. #15
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Portland, Maine
    Posts
    1,997
    I blame myself. Now I know how the cops feel...
    The AI does not love you, nor does it hate you, but you are made out of atoms it might find useful for something else. - Eliezer Yudkowsky

  6. #16
    Senior Member Sam Cro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Hills Of Tennessee
    Posts
    127
    Quote Originally Posted by Dream Burls View Post
    Thanks for getting this thread back on track Sam. I do know that. I also know it costs money and takes a lot more time to finish stabilized blocks, but they will be going to K&G. Thanks for the input everyone. And I got to learn what a BOP is.
    I have not posted any work here of any sorts . However, I will state this when working with any woods, Yes ! It may be expensive and time consuming to work with and finish out a stabilized handle or project. Yet why in the world would any knife maker ever put substandard wood on a blade that they have worked so on ? In honesty No one would ever do it or they should not do it. If they have any pride in their work or themselves . I would take quality over quantity any day of the year or in my life time. Just remember you always get everything you ever pay for . If you use a substandard product doing a project that is what you will get with the finished product .

    Have a Blessed Day & Best Regards

    Sam

  7. #17
    Sponsors Dream Burls's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    1,210
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Cro View Post
    Yes ! It may be expensive and time consuming to work with and finish out a stabilized handle or project. Yet why in the world would any knife maker ever put substandard wood on a blade that they have worked so on ? In honesty No one would ever do it or they should not do it. If they have any pride in their work or themselves .
    Sam, My mission is to sell the highest quality wood I can, but to imply that unstabilized wood is "substandard" is off the mark. There are plenty of hardwoods that can withstand the rigors of kitchen use without being stabilized, as you pointed out in your previous post. The line between acceptable and unacceptable species is sometimes a gray one. I need to make decisions in that gray area and I always err on the side of caution and have my blocks stabilized when there is any doubt in my mind. I also recognize that I'm still learning about this business and that there are forum members with much greater experience and knowledge than I so I reach out for opinions and guidance. Of course, the final decision and the final responsibility is mine. My customers come first and I spare no expense or effort to give them the best product I can.
    Please visit my store at www.dreamburls.com Imagine the possibilities!
    Email me at service@dreamburls.com
    Visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/dream.burls
    All sales are backed with a no questions asked money back guarantee.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Sam Cro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Hills Of Tennessee
    Posts
    127

    I am Not eating words I did not say !

    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Cro View Post
    Stable is the best ! However you as a burl dealer should know this as it is always best to stabilize unless it is a Natural hard,dense and stable wood . Just my .02 worth .

    Sam
    Quote Originally Posted by Dream Burls View Post
    Sam, My mission is to sell the highest quality wood I can, but to imply that unstabilized wood is "substandard" is off the mark. There are plenty of hardwoods that can withstand the rigors of kitchen use without being stabilized, as you pointed out in your previous post. The line between acceptable and unacceptable species is sometimes a gray one. I need to make decisions in that gray area and I always err on the side of caution and have my blocks stabilized when there is any doubt in my mind. I also recognize that I'm still learning about this business and that there are forum members with much greater experience and knowledge than I so I reach out for opinions and guidance. Of course, the final decision and the final responsibility is mine. My customers come first and I spare no expense or effort to give them the best product I can.
    Yes As I noted the first post in Bold there are exceptions to the "Stabilizing Rule" . Yes Your dessication is the ultimate and final to provide the best woods to your customers. and a Happy customer is one that will return to do Business with you many times again if you supply a good product . I did NOT Imply anything of the sort "imply that unstabilized wood is "substandard" ".

    Believe me or Not I may have more wood in my barn then you may have in your store . Thanks to My GGPaw and my GPaw as both were Master Wood Working Craftsman and collected both local and Exotic woods from around the world . I grew up around and work with a ton of different woods ( NOTE: None of the wood is for sell, Nor am I advertizing to do any work for folks here )

    I simply Stated You as a Dealer (With a Company that Sells Both ) should Know if a piece of wood needs to be Stabilized or not ! (also IF I was to take your view about my statement and Assume things, I could look at it in the principles that you do not know your woods well enough to be selling them to your customers to provide the best woods you can. However , I do NOT Assume anything about folks I have never met or know anything about. ) Furthermore, when in doubt (Do the research about the wood ) then if you are still not sure, Stabilize the wood for the satisfaction of the customer and yourself that you have provided the Best Product your Company can offer .

    I really did not intend to get into a cow pile kicking contest with you about wood or its ability to be used for any project. If you wish to end this conversation in the forum and wish to PM me I would be more then Happy to give you My Personal Cell phone number and discuss this with you like Gentlemen with out any assumptions that we do not know what ether of us has the knowledge about wood and working with wood . Yes I will Pay for the conversation to save you some Money .

    Best Regards to you Sir, Have a Blessed Day

    Ret Sgt. Samuel

  9. #19
    Senior Member Sam Cro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Hills Of Tennessee
    Posts
    127
    This May help you with the : As it was a quick search .

    Nargusta (Terminalia amazonia) is a fast-growing, tall tree, reaching 100 to 120 feet in height in the natural forest, with older specimens sometimes reaching 140 feet, with a trunk of 3 to 4 feet in diameter. The tree may have a long clear symmetrical bole of 60 to 70 feet above a strong buttress.
    Because of its beauty, nargusta is used for furniture and cabinet work, boat building, turnery, flooring, interior trim, doors. It is similar in strength to oak and therefore also used in heavy construction.
    The heartwood is resistant to decay and is rated as medium to high. It is reported to be resistant to dry-wood termites, but susceptible to attack by subterranean termites and powder post beetle.
    The natural growth range of the species is reported to extend from southern Mexico southward through Central America and into northern South America to Brazil and Peru.
    Nargusta is generally considered difficult to work by hand, because of its hardness and blunting affect. However, straight-grained sections are more workable and yield excellent results from machining. Fasteners hold well, but gluing capability is poor.
    Other Names: Nargusta, Almendro, Amarillon, Naranjo, Canxan Negro
    Family: Combretaceae
    Common name: roble coral, amarillón
    Comercial name: bullywood
    Roble coral’s wood is heavy or very heavy, with green weight between 1020 and 1100 kg/m3, and 50 to 80 percent moisture content; basic specific weight is 0.68. Based on its physical and mechanical properties, the timber is of high or excellent quality. Its natural durability and fungal resistance could vary with origin, and it has moderate resistance to termite attack.
    The timber is commonly used in heavy general interior and exterior construction, cabinetwork, floors (parquet), decorative veneers, bridge foundations, and boats. According to Flores1 (1994), drying is moderately difficult, but it can vary with wood origin, too. During drying, the wood may show cracks, moderate fissures, and slight twisting.
    In its green state, the sapwood is grayish yellow, and the heartwood is darker. When dry, the sapwood turns orange or yellowish, and the heartwood becomes reddish yellow, light yellowish brown, or yellowish olive with darker reddish or dark brown stripes. The wood tends to oxidize rapidly when it has been exposed to air and light (Flores, 1994). The wood has an interlocked grain, medium texture, and high luster on radial planes, but it is regular on tangential planes, which makes it difficult to finish. Radial cuts are made parallel to the long axis, through the center; the grain pattern is a series of parallel lines. Tangential cuts are parallel to the long axis, anywhere but through the center; the grain pattern is wavy and variable, not all parallel. The lines and veins resulting from both types of cuts make this wood very attractive.
    Terminalia amazonia is the most distributed neotropical species of this genus. It has a wide geographic distribution extending from the Gulf of Mexico in the Atlantic watershed to the Guyanas in South America, including the Antilles (Trinidad and Tobago). In Costa Rica it grows in humid forest on both the northern and southern slopes of the central range, but its frequency has been reduced due to intensive tree cutting.
    It is a tall tree and a dominant species in the evergreen rainforest and very wet forest on both Costa Rica’s watersheds. It can reach heights above 50 m (164 feet), and in some forests, up to 70 m (230 feet) and reaches 120 to 150 cm (4 to 5 feet) DBH. Usually it has a straight trunk, frequently grooved in the basal third. It has conspicuous buttresses (easy to observe), which are longer and wider when the species grows in swampy areas. The bark is quite thin, dull, and grayish brown or grayish yellow colored and exfoliates medium-size flecking plates. It is a helophyte species (grows in full sunlight) and regenerates easily in open areas, forest edges, and pasturelands. It grows at altitudes between 20 and 1200 m (66 and 3937 feet) with annual rainfall above 1500 mm (60 inches), and commonly as a riparian (along the rivers and creeks). The species grows well in many different soil types, but seems to do better on clay soils.
    Blooming occurs between February and April. The fruit ripens between March and May; most flowers develop a fruit, but many fruits lack seeds, so people usually report lower germination rates. The immature fruits are depredated by parrots and parakeet bands.
    Experimental plots of roble coral in the northern zone of Costa Rica with spacing that varies from 2 x 2 m (6.6 x 6.6 feet) and 4 x 4 m (13.12 x 13.12 feet) at three years of age are achieving up to 85% survival, with an average growth of 5 m (16.5 feet) and 5.8 cm (2.28 inches) DBH. This species is believed to have a great future in reforestation programs in the northern and southern zones of Costa Rica.
    1Flores, E. 1994a. Arboles y Semillas del Neotropico. Vol. 3, Nº1. San Jose, Museo Nacional de Costa Rica.

    Best Regards

    Ret Sgt. Samuel

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Cro View Post
    I have not posted any work here of any sorts . However, I will state this when working with any woods, Yes ! It may be expensive and time consuming to work with and finish out a stabilized handle or project. Yet why in the world would any knife maker ever put substandard wood on a blade that they have worked so on ? In honesty No one would ever do it or they should not do it. If they have any pride in their work or themselves . I would take quality over quantity any day of the year or in my life time. Just remember you always get everything you ever pay for . If you use a substandard product doing a project that is what you will get with the finished product .

    Have a Blessed Day & Best Regards

    Sam
    Sounds like an implication to me.
    "Those who say it can't be done are always pasted by those doing it"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •