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Thread: Should I trade in my knife? Shun Kaji or something more like the Moritaka?

  1. #11
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Just use it, and enjoy it, and once you're going to buy your own one, avoid the Moritaka, as it's reseller has happened to be incapable of adressing the numerous overgrind issues.

  2. #12
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    You should just use it since its a gift and all, just when you go to buy a new knife you can get something better and you will already be more experienced at maintenance since you have practiced with the one your parents bought you.

  3. #13
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    You'd be downgrading. Shuns are a lot better than people like to admit.
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

  4. #14
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    Don't shun the Shun. It'll be a good gateway drug and a good way to establish your needs, and probably a good opportunity to practice sharpening and thinning. A lot of knife use is technique anyway; despite having a few really sharp knives with really thin edges, I've never been able to speed-chop a carrot or potato like I've seen in some videos. Even my best knives with excellent edges are not effortless through all food.

    Your parents did pretty well. And like a few others have said, just appreciate the gift as a gift.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by XooMG View Post
    Don't shun the Shun. It'll be a good gateway drug and a good way to establish your needs, and probably a good opportunity to practice sharpening and thinning. A lot of knife use is technique anyway; despite having a few really sharp knives with really thin edges, I've never been able to speed-chop a carrot or potato like I've seen in some videos. Even my best knives with excellent edges are not effortless through all food.

    Your parents did pretty well. And like a few others have said, just appreciate the gift as a gift.
    +1 except the Kaji line is SG-2 with damascus cladding.. I don't have first hand experience with either (Shun's SG-2 knives or their cladding) but it wouldn't be the type of knife I'd recommend someone learn thinning on. Better to get something softer & less expensive IMO.

    It's a nice gift though. And there's always room for more knives

  6. #16
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    I really dont like shun knives for many reasons but I have one shun that I do find quite nice to use its a honesuki elite shun in sg2 steel and it sharpens up very well and holds it for awhile. If I was you I would just keep it and use it and buy more knives based on what you like and dont like about this knife there is no perfect knife and the more you try the closer you get to one that you really enjoy using

  7. #17
    My parents are perfectly happy with me trading for a different knife. I know how some might feel, but really it's a moot point. I added that in just to quell the potential sadness some might think knowing I would just so readily trade in the gift. They are just happy I finally have a solid knife, no matter what I end up with. Just the way our family is I guess. Now if I was exchanging for a totally different gift, then I would feel bad.

    Looks like the 240mm kochi's are currently sold out, I will have to email up and check on that. It is about the same price range but definitely is the type of knife I was looking at about a year ago. Any other suggestions on a similarly priced 240mm gyuto? Doesn't have to have a kurouchi finish, I just kinda like that rustic look. The masamotos are nice but a bit beyond my price range if I hope to pick up some sharpening equipment that I can keep for specifically kitchen knives.

    My good friend that I have worked with in my hobby/side business for years has a father that is one of the last living survivors of Hiroshima atomic bomb who came to america and fought for us in the korean war. His wife which acts like my mom when I am over at his parents house is exceedingly nice, and her knife has been passed down for generations. It still sports the Chrysanthemum Seal from sometime after the Meiji era. So I sort of have a long term mentality with a professional grade knife. I have an affinity for Japanese wood and metal working, not to mention CNC machining. I love tools with soul, which draws me to the more off-brand imported beauties.

    Thank you all for feedback, still deciding on the exact route to take. Please feel free to offer up more suggestions as you see fit.

    -Brad

  8. #18
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    +1 to that !

  9. #19
    I have been looking into the Takeda, Yoshikane, and Konosuke lines.

    Any opinions, thoughts, or comments?

  10. #20
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    Personally I think that a Yoshikane is better than a Takeda in every way that is important in a gyuto. Be aware that recently, Takeda has changed their grind/geometry (it would seem) - not for the better either.

    There are many different Konosukes, they are a reseller rather than a blacksmith's shop (I believe).

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