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Thread: Check out my "new" chopping block

  1. #11
    Senior Member Potato42's Avatar
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    Wow, that sucker dwarfs even Andy's massive butcher block. So when are you planning on resurfacing it? Can we get some more pictures of it later, perhaps with something other than a cell phone?

    Speaking of blocks, I just back from visiting David at his shop. I guess I need to get busy on those photos...
    - Sean

  2. #12
    For resurfacing, your best bet will be a handheld belt sander - from the likes of Porter Cable or Bosch and a number of low grit belts to start. Once you flatten the surface, you can move onto an orbital sander.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

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  3. #13
    I have both of those, what grit should I start with and go to?
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  4. #14

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    I've a very similar rock maple block (except with about 4" x 4" legs). I'm guessing it weighs close to 300#.

    The only way I can move it is to very carefully tip it over on its side and then turn it upside down so that the center of gravity is low & I can wedge a hand truck under it.

    You do not want to get a finger pinched underneath it!

    Bought mine at an auction house in SF about 30 years ago. As I was waiting for it to come up for bid, a guy in a white butcher's smock came in and took a seat. I figured I'd lose the auction to him, but I guess he must have been on his lunch break 'cause he got up and left before the butcher block came up. If I recall correctly, I got mine for $130.00.

    James

  5. #15
    I would start with 50 or even 36 grit. You want to go as aggressive as you can removing material that would normally clog up finer belts (I take the block has been oiled). Use a belt cleaner stick, and you won't need as many belts. After that go to 80 grit. I don't think you need to go past 80, but if you insist, go to 100 and stop there.


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  6. #16
    Thanks Marko. I am going to hit the sides a bit too just to even out the finish I bit. And smooth out a chip that you can see on one side in the middle of the top facing corner.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  7. #17

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    You might try setting up a laser level on a tripod so that you can see where the high spots are - where you need to remove material - otherwise it's pretty hard to get things level with a handheld belt sander. At least for me....

    James

  8. #18
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    That thing is great!
    50 grit eats quite a bit of wood. It would be my first instinct and if Marko suggests it, I agree 100%.
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    Thanks Marko. I am going to hit the sides a bit too just to even out the finish I bit. And smooth out a chip that you can see on one side in the middle of the top facing corner.
    John,
    sides don't drop below 80 grit and do it with an orbit sander. Belt sander keep two hands on it. That thing can be beastly. One way to do it, is to keep it static, and sand in bursts.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  10. #20
    I do not have a laser level. I was going to put some sandpaper on a 2x4 longer than the block is wide and identify high spots by the scratch pattern. Like flattening a stone. Unless someone else has a better idea?
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

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