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Thread: A completely new set

  1. #21
    Wow that's a big budget, I think I spent half that and have a 270 Harner gyuto, a 210 hhh gyuto, a catcheside petty, a 240 Davis suji and now a small Harner paring knife. I am quite happy with this set up as a home cook. Certainly much nicer than my wusthofs all are stainless by the way since I am not to be trusted with carbon

    Keep your eyes open in the BST and you can get some great knives. I know there is a very sweet Harner the right now.

  2. #22
    I would like to thank everyone for all of their input. It has really given me some serious thought. I have been searching the BST for knives. Maybe I can get something that will work from there. I have also been reading more and more about other knives. Does anyone have any opinions on Z Kramer knives? I have also fallen in love (boy is that weird to say) with this Burke knife. I have no idea how much this costs, but it sure is beautiful. I know that I won't be going in that direction anytime soon, but it sure is nice to admire. Lastly, does anyone have any opinion of shapton pro stones?


  3. #23
    Senior Member jimbob's Avatar
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    You'll find nothing but love here for burke knives! It would cost a bit, but you do have a healthy budget, and gyuto is most important knife...... Sure is stunning.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by mojojojo View Post
    I would like to thank everyone for all of their input. It has really given me some serious thought. I have been searching the BST for knives. Maybe I can get something that will work from there. I have also been reading more and more about other knives. Does anyone have any opinions on Z Kramer knives? I have also fallen in love (boy is that weird to say) with this Burke knife. I have no idea how much this costs, but it sure is beautiful. I know that I won't be going in that direction anytime soon, but it sure is nice to admire. Lastly, does anyone have any opinion of shapton pro stones?

    Bill makes incredible knives!!! But that will eat up the majority of your budget, and will take a year or two to get. but it is an heirloom piece that will serve you for life.

    If that's what you want email Daniel or Drew from Epicurian Edge, they get them quite often, and may be able to speed up the process.
    Huw
    In order to make delicious food, you must eat delicious food. Jiro Ono

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by kpnv View Post
    i don't recommend jumping from a costco to a catcheside.

    pick whatever knives you want but i recommend stuff that's less expensive to begin with. just because you have a massive budget doesn't mean you need to spend it all. pick something that you like the aesthetic of the most and has the best reputation. personally, i'm a big fan of ginga. they're not cheap but also not super expensive and still deliver excellent bang for buck. cutting with a stainless ginga will probably be really effortless for the first few weeks/months at home.

    what i do recommend is

    210/240mm ginga gyuto
    120/150mm misono/fujiwara/tojiro petty (180mm petty is a little unwieldy for a home cook. it's my line knife and i love it but it's overkill for household cooking duties. a 120 or 150 would be more handy.)
    beater cleaver from chinatown/chinese store. something robust and about $20-30. a #6 is a slicer type cleaver. it's thin and delicate for veg and meat prep, not bone breaking. it's more of a gyuto replacement. if you are capable with slicer cleavers, you'd love a ginga/sugimoto #6 but then you wouldn't want/need a gyuto or even a petty.
    misono bread knife is good. mac is nicer.
    victorinox paring knife
    atoma 140 for flattening
    chosera/shapton etc 1k and 5k or thereabouts.
    stone holder

    you're better off spending on great stones that will last a lifetime instead of expensive customs that can never satisfy for long. go easy and enjoy the journey.

    i disagree with starting with less expensive stuff to begin with. For a few reasons, for me i ended up going that way. i spent about 400$ on knives and stones and got a lot for my money, well i thought. I ended up not liking most of it and wanted to upgrade rather soon. What i found was the cheaper knives didn't hold their value as well as the stones and honestly i still have most of them laying around that never get used.

    So in that aspect i threw away about 400$ rather than putting that towards stuff i really wanted, but was scared to buy at the time. I would say definitely get good stones to start the best you can buy this will not hinder your sharpening only improve it from the get go. But start with the medium grits until you get the hang out it like 2k-4k.

    Also maybe buy one cheaper knife to practice sharpening with, like a tojiro or a fujiwara, still have decent steel, but rather cheap and will offer feedback.

    now the knives KPNV mentioned are all more than worthy and good products, just the theory of starting cheap doesn't always work. Misono and Gesshin Ginga are both awesome blades for a great price. Anything really from jon at JKI is going to be a good product.

    good luck

  6. #26
    Thank you for your advice. I was starting to sway towards not spending a lot, but your post makes a lot of sense. I will reach out to Jon at JKI to see what he says. Do you think that a 180 Gesshin Ginga is too much of knife for a home cook? Thank you again.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by mojojojo View Post
    Thank you for your advice. I was starting to sway towards not spending a lot, but your post makes a lot of sense. I will reach out to Jon at JKI to see what he says. Do you think that a 180 Gesshin Ginga is too much of knife for a home cook? Thank you again.
    A 180 will and can get the job done, however for larger tasks may not be ideal. The most versatile size is a 240mm for a gyuto and can very well work in a home kitchen depending on your board size. I would recommend not going under 210 for your main gyuto but again its all personal preference. A petty or paring knife can be sued for smaller tasks. Del makes some awesome knives in that size for a great price.

    Gesshin ginga are great knives, very thin and very sharp with decent edge retention. Should be ideal in a home kitchen. Although Jon knows all his knives and how they perform, im sure he can steer you in the right direction. If your going to pick up a knife from him definetly check out his stones, i have used a lot of stones and i can honestly say other than Jnat i wont purchase any except gesshin.. well until i get the whole set haha

  8. #28
    Are you talking about a 180 for your main knife? I think that's too short. If you're talking about it as your smaller knife, it's probably too long.

    Get a kick ass 210 or 240 gyuto. As much as you'd feel comfortable spending on a knife you will actually use. Maybe a Gesshin Heiji? I've never tried one, but people seem to love them.

    You might be able to get by with a 120ish as a smaller knife. Or maybe a paring and a 150 petty.

    There's a lot of overlap with a gyuto and a cleaver (this is coming from someone who has knives with A LOT of overlap). But if you want both, get both.

    If your fiance isn't ready to take care of carbon, get some semi-stainless, or a good, properly heat-treated carbon.

    Just curious, what's the focus on the fork? Nothing wrong with that, but just curious what it means to you.

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