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Thread: Singatirin honyaki

  1. #1

    Singatirin honyaki

    I know nothing about these knives. Anyone with any experience please contribute.

    Thanks,
    Jesse

  2. #2
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    Never owned one, but remember they have an unusual straight hamon, are ground quite thin for a honyaki, have a unique profile, and are priced right....
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
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  3. #3
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    I really liked mine. Didn't use it quite enough to keep it, though.

  4. #4
    Pardon my ignorance but what is a hamon?

  5. #5
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    Its the line caused by the differential hardening of a honyaki blade. Toward the spine a section of the knife will be coated in clay as to not be hardened as much as the edge steel, no to be confused with the lamination line on a san mai knife, which runs along the edge.

    Hamons are normally wavy and can look quite stunning when polished up.

  6. #6
    Thanks dusty! Are these knives ground with a preference for righties? I am one of those devious left handers. I did a search on the forum and found that people had to do some handle modification and blade thinning but it sounded like those we're previous versions of the knives. Are these still issues?

  7. #7
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    El Pescador's Avatar
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    Don't buy it for the hamon, as mines almost not there. They are pretty 50/50 on the grind. My suji is a great knife with an amazing grind. The steel itself get insanely sharp and I wouldn't consider it more brittle than other knives. You do have to careful as they are carbon and therefore reactive but no as much as some other carbon knives I have used like a Misono Swedish.
    "So you want to be a vegetarian? Hitler was a vegetarian and look at how he turned out."

  8. #8
    Do you guys suggest jumping at one of these or waiting for a Kato

  9. #9
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JessePowers View Post
    Do you guys suggest jumping at one of these or waiting for a Kato
    totally different knives. the Singatirin is a steal, however. I'm likely to get another one, but in suji form. There are other knives I like better as gyutos (personal preference), but I think the construction and geometry of the knife would be fab as a slicer, if so configured, and might actually be a suji I use regularly and keep. The steel is wonderful, too.

  10. #10
    Senior Member KimBronnum's Avatar
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    I own the suji and I´m very happy about it - handle, steel, geometry and performance. I strongly recommend it. I also just discovered that Maksim has a discount on the Singatirins these days
    I think the "handle issue" was with an older stock, and I think the issue was that the handle was placed oddly. I can say that the handle on mine is placed as it would be on any other wa handeled knife. Havn´t tried the gyuto - only the suji.
    I also have a Kato (gyuto) and I agree with you, EdipisR., that the two knives are very different. Even the steel feels very different in my oppinion.
    - KIm

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