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  1. #11
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    thanks VB, anybody tried the gesshin 220 stone yet?

  2. #12
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    I have a smaller combination 1000/6000 Suehiro Cerax stone (see my review in Reviews section). The 1000 side was rather slow and dished quickly, the 6000 side was OK. I would get something else (better).

  3. #13
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    ok turns out i couldn't order from TFJ because they were closed for holidays. i'm going to pick up both a cerax 320 and a sigma select ii 240. my quest for a thinning stone continues. dmt works the fastest but i really really hate using it and would love nothing more than to find a fast cutting stone that isn't awful feeling. i got to try a jns 300 but it's still not fast enough for me. i'm guessing i just have to suck it up and deal with dishing and go with a soft stone that releases abrasive really fast to get the most cutting action.

  4. #14
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    dont do it!

  5. #15
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    too late already pulled the trigger!

  6. #16
    Soft low grit stones dish fast, it's a fact of life.
    "Those who say it can't be done are always pasted by those doing it"

  7. #17
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bahamaroot View Post
    Soft low grit stones dish fast, it's a fact of life.
    all low grit stones dish fast. soft or hard, in my experience. infact, i think pretty much every low grit stone ive ever used(300 grit and lower) more or less sucks to use, but doesnt suck as bad as diamond stones. lesser of 2 evils, no?

  8. #18
    Agreed.
    "Those who say it can't be done are always pasted by those doing it"

  9. #19
    still hunting for the "perfect" thinning stone but I think the diamonds have ended up being the unfortunate winner for me, although I'm fairly terrible with thinning in itself. It can be a big job on some knives and I guess I'm not completely adept at making sure my stones are flat all the time as I guess I get impatient and just want to get the results straight away. The diamonds stay flat and cut well. I hate the feel of them and the deep scratches but it works. I bought a Watanabe 270mm gyuto recently and spend hours thinning it into something it was never truly meant to be. I feel like I haven't done the knife justice (it certainly isn't pretty anymore) and I feel a little embarrassed to show it here. In the future I think I will stick to diamonds though as it seems to be more consistent for me as they stay flat. I'm very impatient and I hate spending time to flatten my stones in the middle of thinning something. In saying that, I've found it to be more efficient to flatten my stones out in my backyard on the cement than to flatten them with my xxc. I have a pink brick, sigma 400 and a bester 500 outside of my xxc and xc dmt--all of which I have tried for thinning. I've even considered getting a finer grit dmt to try as I'm hoping they will still cut fast but the scratches a lot easier to remove (I've found my xc to be far more forgiving than the xxc). Most of my coarse stones I figure will mostly get used for cleaning up the damage done with the diamonds (the pink brick wears away very quickly, but seems to cover up those scratches quite well) until I decide which one I like most and I'll try to sell the others off someday. I wish I could replicate some of the awesome finishes I've seen on some wide double bevel knives. I always end up with an uneven finish and a very wavy "shinogi" which drives me insane. It gets really noticable even at 1k. In a nutshell... The whole sharpening experience has turned out to be rather expensive for me, but I do enjoy it.

  10. #20
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by masibu View Post
    still hunting for the "perfect" thinning stone but I think the diamonds have ended up being the unfortunate winner for me, although I'm fairly terrible with thinning in itself. It can be a big job on some knives and I guess I'm not completely adept at making sure my stones are flat all the time as I guess I get impatient and just want to get the results straight away. The diamonds stay flat and cut well. I hate the feel of them and the deep scratches but it works. I bought a Watanabe 270mm gyuto recently and spend hours thinning it into something it was never truly meant to be. I feel like I haven't done the knife justice (it certainly isn't pretty anymore) and I feel a little embarrassed to show it here. In the future I think I will stick to diamonds though as it seems to be more consistent for me as they stay flat. I'm very impatient and I hate spending time to flatten my stones in the middle of thinning something. In saying that, I've found it to be more efficient to flatten my stones out in my backyard on the cement than to flatten them with my xxc. I have a pink brick, sigma 400 and a bester 500 outside of my xxc and xc dmt--all of which I have tried for thinning. I've even considered getting a finer grit dmt to try as I'm hoping they will still cut fast but the scratches a lot easier to remove (I've found my xc to be far more forgiving than the xxc). Most of my coarse stones I figure will mostly get used for cleaning up the damage done with the diamonds (the pink brick wears away very quickly, but seems to cover up those scratches quite well) until I decide which one I like most and I'll try to sell the others off someday. I wish I could replicate some of the awesome finishes I've seen on some wide double bevel knives. I always end up with an uneven finish and a very wavy "shinogi" which drives me insane. It gets really noticable even at 1k. In a nutshell... The whole sharpening experience has turned out to be rather expensive for me, but I do enjoy it.
    what a coincidence, im busting my tail thinning a watanabe 270 myself. yeah its quite a project and its taking forever. good luck with that.

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