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Thread: First Sharpen

  1. #1

    First Sharpen

    Testing my new sharpening skills on this garbage before my Hiro gets here. All I've got is a King k80 250/1000 stone. Ive followed JKI basic youtube guides. Trying to get this knife as sharp as possible, knowing that its not be capable of extreme sharpness. Any tips? It has a chip and is very dull, but I've made some minor progress my first time around. Im mainly asking because I have no idea what to expect from this blade.



  2. #2
    Senior Member Notaskinnychef's Avatar
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    take your time, and keep an eye on your angles, plus keeping an eye on making sure you hit each area equally (subject to damage/thinning). Using the market trick is also helpful. Run a sharpie along the edge and as you slowly remove material you can see where you have hit, and also where you've missed. I know the first time I sharpened (on a hampton forge too ironically enough lol) I wasn't hitting the heel enough and found that I had an indent all the way along below the heel line. Nothing my new few rounds wouldn't cover, but sure looked funny when I took a step back and looked at the carnage.

    As for stones, my knowledge on them is equally crappy as my sharpening knowledge, but for daily use, 1k is usually fine. I have a 4k that I sometimes use depending on the knife, but a lot of the time I just hit the 1k and leave it with that toothy edge. Good luck

  3. #3
    Senior Member JHunter's Avatar
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    I like my king 1200 better than the 1000 good $30 to spend and as stated try the marker to get a look at how and where your hitting the edge just relax and it will work

  4. #4
    Which side of the stone have you been using?

    In theory you could get that knife pretty darn sharp taking the chips off and putting a new edge w/ the 250, then going to the 1000 and maybe stropping on newspaper (?? not something I do but an idea) to finish.

    The problem is it can be easy to do more damage than good with such a coarse stone... especially when learning technique. But since it seems like this knife isn't going to see much use, why not? Take your time and get that sucker nice.. That way you'll have more confidence when you take the Hiro to the stones. Practice makes perfect, right? Just focus on raising, flipping, and removing that burr.

    It will also make you appreciate just how nice sharpening your carbon knife is I love my Hiromoto and it sees a whole lot of action. They do need some serious thinning once you wear them down (which is another cool skill to learn) but I don't see that being much of an issue with just occasional home use.

  5. #5
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    Make sure not to push too hard into the stone; keep it light

  6. #6
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by James View Post
    Make sure not to push too hard into the stone; keep it light
    In general a good advice. With soft stainless on a coarse stone, though, you will need depending on the stone type an incredible pressure when you establish a relief bevel.
    An other specific difficulty with these steels is getting rid of the burr. It's hard because of the large carbides. You have to carefully abrade the burr; once weakened it won't fall off like with other steel types.
    Not exactly a good introduction to sharpening practice, I would say.
    For learning sharpening, you better have a simple thin carbon blade. Think an Opinel "au carbone", an Old Hickory, a basic Robert Herder or so. Great to understand what it takes to raise a burr, chasing it and getting rid of it.
    Soft stainless is probably the most frustrating steel to start with.

  7. #7
    I used the marker trick. my angles of approach are all good, per JKI marker video. although im not sure this knife has any edge bevel to speak of. regardless, ive made one now. having a tough time getting it sharper than it is at the moment. ive spent about 10 minutes on the 250x and 5 minutes on the 1000x. wont cut arm hair yet. any further suggestions?

  8. #8
    I also used a leather belt to strop. to be honest im not even sure im getting much of a burr yet. very hard to tell.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by eighteesix View Post
    I also used a leather belt to strop. to be honest im not even sure im getting much of a burr yet. very hard to tell.
    If you are not getting a burr then you are not hitting the actual edge. You may just be thinning at this point.
    Fudoushin Bujinkan Dojo: http://fudoushin.com/

  10. #10
    Senior Member Geo87's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eighteesix View Post
    I also used a leather belt to strop. to be honest im not even sure im getting much of a burr yet. very hard to tell.

    Right there is your answer. If your not sure you have a burr or not, then you don't have one. On a coarse stone it will be very noticeable. Do a thumb drag across the edge (Not along! ) it should feel catchy or even kinda sharp from one side( the opposite side to what you just sharpened ) but the other side will not be "catchy" at all . If you are holding the right angle...keep going on one side till your 100 % sure you have a burr...
    As it has been mentioned cheap stainless knives are not the best to learn on. Although I guess they are good for practicing maintaining an angle.
    I know learning can get frustrating and confusing but stick at it! Good things shouldn't be easy and this is a skill well worth learning.

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