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Thread: Wide bevel sharpening

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Wide bevel sharpening

    Hi all,

    I'm having trouble keeping the shinogi line clean and non-wavy on my wide-bevel gyuto (a Konosuke Fujiyama, soon to be joined by a Heiji).
    Any advice? What should I look out for when practicing?

  2. #2
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    A couple of things that help me are to keep your left hand fingers under shinogi line (assuming right hand is holding the handle) so that there will be less tendency to flip the knife over and blur the line; and a relatively flat stone will help keeping the line sharp.

  3. #3
    Some wide bevel gyutos do not have a crisp shinogi and never will, they have hammer blows/marks right at the top of the bevel and there's nothing you can do about this.

    Now if the knife came with nice crisp shinogi line then maybe it's your technique. More practice!

  4. #4
    When your sharpening on a water stone, keep changing the direction slightly every 15-20 strokes then look at the blade , you will be able to see where you need to put more pressure and where to put less.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    Some wide bevel gyutos do not have a crisp shinogi and never will, they have hammer blows/marks right at the top of the bevel and there's nothing you can do about this.

    Now if the knife came with nice crisp shinogi line then maybe it's your technique. More practice!
    I'm pretty sure it's my technique. Do you have any suggestions on what I should do when I practice?
    Is it better to learn with a coarser stone (less strokes, less potential messes), or a medium one (more strokes but less consequences per stroke)?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Jacobson View Post
    When your sharpening on a water stone, keep changing the direction slightly every 15-20 strokes then look at the blade , you will be able to see where you need to put more pressure and where to put less.
    What do you mean by changing the direction exactly?

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by perneto View Post
    I'm pretty sure it's my technique. Do you have any suggestions on what I should do when I practice?
    Is it better to learn with a coarser stone (less strokes, less potential messes), or a medium one (more strokes but less consequences per stroke)?
    Medium, coarse just lets you mess up faster.
    Available handles- [url]http://s64.photobucket.com/user/mkriggen/library/Available20handles[/url]

    Rule #1- Don't sweat the small s%&t, rule #2- It's ALL small s%&t
    Mikey

  8. #8
    Oh, and Jon at JKI has several excellent sharpening videos on youtube.
    Available handles- [url]http://s64.photobucket.com/user/mkriggen/library/Available20handles[/url]

    Rule #1- Don't sweat the small s%&t, rule #2- It's ALL small s%&t
    Mikey

  9. #9
    I vote for an extra coarse stone. My thought is that as long as you go slow and stop to look what you're doing you can control what you screw up on. When using a coarse stone you get the bevel set to where you want it before you get fatigues and start screwing up. Using a medium or fine stone is for making things look pretty/refining scratch patterns/tough ups, coarse stones do the work.

  10. #10
    LOL, considering relative levels of experience and expertise (his huge amount, my tiny amount), you'd probably be better off listening to Dave

    Be well,
    Mikey
    Available handles- [url]http://s64.photobucket.com/user/mkriggen/library/Available20handles[/url]

    Rule #1- Don't sweat the small s%&t, rule #2- It's ALL small s%&t
    Mikey

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