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Thread: Respect the classics, man!

  1. #21
    Senior Member hambone.johnson's Avatar
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    I would have to agree on the yoshikane skd steel. It was MY first eye opener knife and after 7 or 8 years and some light thinning it's still bangin out prep.

    I would say that takeda has to be a classic. I have one of those also and it's amazing what he can do with AS. And his gyuto profiles are so different I think you should try it just for originality.

    I think in the future the DT ITK could be a classic. (It's current age since original production isn't old enough to be a classic) but I think what the ITK could represent in the future and what Devin did with making really high end "mid tech" knives could make that knife a classic in short time. So many other makers have tried to follow that rout since his success.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Hbeernink's Avatar
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    I was thinking the suisin inox honyaki as well - I've never used one, but the hybrid handle and (from what I've heard) great steel and grind makes it sound like a solid all arounder.

    takeda for sure - really has a unique place

  3. #23
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    The original Takeda gyuto profile was unique (think giant santoku), ironically pressure on him to make a more conventional, less flat-profiled knife resulted in the new breed of Takedas. Now flat profile is all the rage.

    Other "classics"? - Ichimonji TKC and the Ikkanshi Tadatsuna Inox.

  4. #24

    knyfeknerd's Avatar
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    Any of the Henckel 102 series. Oldies. Carbon. Awesome. If you can find one-buy it!
    If "Its" and "Buts" was candy and nuts, we'd all have a Merry Christmas
    -Cleon "Slammin'" Salmon

  5. #25
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Sabatier "La Trompette" from the 1890's, the archetype of the modern chef's knive.

  6. #26
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timthebeaver View Post
    It's because he's been known as a maker for getting on 10 years - not esoteric enough any more.

    In the same category, Yoshikane SKD - Wicked distal taper, excellent geometry and tough steel that takes a very aggressive edge.
    Like Yoshikane, it's my understanding that many knives with the Watanabe name are no longer actually made by the originator, and are not the same as they used to be. I can't say one way or another whether this is true, but I can say that the recent Yoshis I've seen aren't anywhere as good as the Yoshis from a few years ago that I've handled or owned. They used to be thin at the edge. Maybe some still are.

  7. #27
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    Like Yoshikane, it's my understanding that many knives with the Watanabe name are no longer actually made by the originator, and are not the same as they used to be. I can't say one way or another whether this is true, but I can say that the recent Yoshis I've seen aren't anywhere as good as the Yoshis from a few years ago that I've handled or owned. They used to be thin at the edge. Maybe some still are.
    watanabes definitely arent very thin behind the edge, but i dont think theyre intended to be. there is plenty of steel to work with OOTB which i like because i can tweak it to my own tastes. the one i own was made within the last year, and i will say the profile is what makes it feel like a classic knife. infact im willing to bet the wat profile influenced alot of other makers over the years too. the edge retention is pretty insane too. beats anything else carbon ive used, including some AS knives. i can only imagine how insanely nice wats made several years ago are.

  8. #28
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    I've never seen a Watanabe, only the Yoshikanes, which used to be very thin behind the edge.

  9. #29
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Yoshis have changed, but not all of them. But, yes, Edipis is 100% bang on. Try an Itinomonn, if you want to know what the classic Yoshi was all about.

    Classics? Murray Carter sub 180mm SFGZ Funayuki, Nogent Parer, Tall Takeda gyuto.
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

  10. #30
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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by knyfeknerd View Post
    Any of the Henckel 102 series. Oldies. Carbon. Awesome. If you can find one-buy it!
    hey, ass hat, don't give them any ideas. look what happened with forgecrafts. Now I can't afford my favorite knife. You keep giving away my secrets and I won't be able to afford them either.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

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