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maybe an old Sabatier knife isnt for me?
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Thread: maybe an old Sabatier knife isnt for me?

  1. #1
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    maybe an old Sabatier knife isnt for me?

    i searched high/low for one. found one, and pounced on it.

    it is pretty stunning. nice patina, no cracks in the handle. super sharp. nice sexy blade profile. slender, flat, light.

    now having said that, i am not so sure it is working for me. please excuse my ignorance..i grown into adult hood working chef's knives the same. i move it in a locomotion action and kinda push the food into the churning blade. (i'm sure you guys have an official name for this style). i choke up on the handle and pinch the blade.

    if i do this with the sabatier, it is kinda awkward. feels like my hand is really low, close to the board, and my hand angle feels skewed to the inside of my body. does this description make any sense?

    my rounder profiles knives seem to cut faster and smoother for me. should i be lifting the knife up and down..in more of a push/chop movement?

    am i suppose to use a different cut style with a flatter profile blade? i love the flat blade Gyotos..super sexy. am i gonna have the same issues if i buy one?

  2. #2
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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    You are rock chopping and that works very well with knives with bellies. Germans and a lot of other European knives. The Sabatier because of its flatter triangular profile works better at push cutting. your flatter profile gyutos are also push cutters. It takes awhile to break the rock chopping technique but once you get push cutting down it comes easy.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    This description by Boar D Laze may be helpful, I hope.

    http://www.cookfoodgood.com/?p=405

  4. #4
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    did you purchase an old used vintage one? you have to be careful with those because sometimes they can be oversharpened and the profile can become dead flat. sabs seem to be better at pull cuts and guillotine cuts.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    You see a lot of protruding heels and recurve bellies due to oversteeling, but repair is easy although sometimes fastidious.
    Please note that with brand new French blades a deadly flat section from heel to the middle is very common. It's meant for chopping with both hands.

  6. #6
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    Makes sense I use two hands with cleavers often when chopping.

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