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Thread: Cut Brooklyn: Opinions?

  1. #11
    Senior Member AFKitchenknivesguy's Avatar
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    I thought WS was carrying them? Either way the guy has some great marketing going on. I was shocked by the $600 price tag though. His name has floated around in the forums for a couple years now, but never builds steam. To me, that says a lot. We are some pretty loose billed folks, so for no one to drop the change to try one out says a lot. Maybe if he changed his steel and started participating here to learn more about what kitchen knife folks look for things would change? And as far as this statement, "I've got a gyuto in his Journeyman series, which uses 1095 carbon steel. It's a simple steel, but a solid performer that has proven itself in outdoor knives."...what makes it a gyuto (marketing?) and not a chefs? Interchangeable at times to makers trying to immitate j-makers but is that the case here? Also, 1095 is not a bad steel, but you made an important point...outdoor knives and kitchen knives are apples and oranges. Just because teak makes a good outdoor furniture wood doesn't mean I want to make a cutting board out of it.
    Jason

  2. #12
    What additional steps are done in-house? (Not a challenge, I'm genuinely curious.)

    I concede that there are better deals than CB, but for me, that's not always the bottom line. If certain desirable features and design elements are present on a particular knife, then I'm in.

    Edited to add:

    AFKitchenknivesguy: I took the liberty of calling it a gyuto based on the overall shape (the geometry is similar to many Japanese knives, which was one of the immediately appealing factors for me). Not to mention the fact that the term is common parlance around these parts. Joel doesn't use the term, so far as I'm aware.

    Good analogy with the teak example. Maybe you're right. So far my experience has been that it's a very serviceable knife. Perhaps he'll change his carbon choice if he gets enough negative feedback on it.
    Last edited by thehessian; 06-16-2011 at 02:57 PM. Reason: self explanatory

  3. #13
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    Having a couple of demanding pro cooks put one through it's paces would sure help his cause. Too many knives out there for less $ that have been proven to be good performers. For a non-damascus carbon, the price of entry is a bit high unless his knives have been building a good track record in the kitchen. Only a few kitchen knife makers have a reputation good enough to support higher prices.
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  4. #14
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    I find 1095 an odd choice for a high end knife. There are so many other choices in carbon steel that provide better performance.
    Spike C
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  5. #15
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WildBoar View Post
    Having a couple of demanding pro cooks put one through it's paces would sure help his cause. Too many knives out there for less $ that have been proven to be good performers. For a non-damascus carbon, the price of entry is a bit high unless his knives have been building a good track record in the kitchen. Only a few kitchen knife makers have a reputation good enough to support higher prices.
    I will agree 100% that his knives haven't been tried by any of us, and that for the money, I'd go another obvious direction.
    However, just because he hasn't been "discovered" by us, or involved in a passaround here doesn't mean he isn't floating knives around with chef's elsewhere.
    He has brooklyn on his doorstep and the other boroughs in his backyard. I guarantee he's getting input from somewhere. TRUST ME on this one.
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  6. #16
    Senior Member AFKitchenknivesguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    I will agree 100% that his knives haven't been tried by any of us, and that for the money, I'd go another obvious direction.
    However, just because he hasn't been "discovered" by us, or involved in a passaround here doesn't mean he isn't floating knives around with chef's elsewhere.
    He has brooklyn on his doorstep and the other boroughs in his backyard. I guarantee he's getting input from somewhere. TRUST ME on this one.
    Actually, he was discovered by us almost two years ago. No one pulled the trigger to buy one, so no feedback was ever given. To my memory, the steel and design were the major drawbacks...can't remember what he charged then but it was near the price now.
    Jason

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    I will agree 100% that his knives haven't been tried by any of us, and that for the money, I'd go another obvious direction.
    However, just because he hasn't been "discovered" by us, or involved in a passaround here doesn't mean he isn't floating knives around with chef's elsewhere.
    He has brooklyn on his doorstep and the other boroughs in his backyard. I guarantee he's getting input from somewhere. TRUST ME on this one.
    Lefty,
    CB was mentioned on the forums for at least 2 years that I can remember. Joel paid a visit to Dave, who had some good things to say about the knife (handle is comfortable comes to mind) but I don't know anybody on any of the three forums - KF, FF, and now KKF, who actually owns one.

    How did it become popular in NYC? Well, there was a couple of writeups, one in NY Times (and recently on CB end-grain boards, followed by latest article about knives) and at least a couple of small video interview online that I know of. The author in the NY Times didn't have much experience writing about knvies, which made me wonder, so I asked a friend who writes a column in a local newspaper and is familiar with the industry, and he told me that this is is how the paper makes money - you approach an agent, shell out 6-8K and get a nice write up about you by people often unfamiliar with the subject.

    CB probably gets some imput from the forums, but he never bothered to join and to have his knives evaluated. Which I think is mistake if you are serious. But Joel's market is not pros, and educated home cooks. His market is young, wealthy professionals who like expensive things without knowing much about them. The emphasis on handle material and mozaic pins (designer stuff) speaks for itself. I have no doubts his knives will outcut German steel, but to claim that best knives come from Japan and Brooklyn (which I am sure he was joking about), is ludicrous.

    Don't want to sound overly negative, but there are A makers, and B makers. Everybody starts from B, but some people stay there, even as time goes by. That is how I view things. Plain and simple.


    M


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  8. #18
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Mentioned, yes. I mean "discovered" as in tried out. Sorry for the ambiguity.
    09/06

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  9. #19
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    I definitely get you Marko. I think he should join here, but to each his own, I guess.
    I'm just saying, he does have people using his product and giving their opinions...just not us!
    09/06

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  10. #20
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    A driving force in the forums is exploration. People are always on the look out for the next great knife. A knife maker to get people to take a chance on his knife, must have one of the following:

    1. Price point - most of the popular brands, started at a low price point. Not a huge loss, if the knife didn't work out.
    2. Steel - A new type of steel will generate interest. Konosukes HD being the latest example.
    3. Reputation of the maker. Dave was able to pre-sell a number of knives, based on his reputation.

    Cut Brooklyn's price point has always been high. At least a $100 - $200 higher then a comparable gyuto.
    The steel doesn't get anybody excited.
    While Joel is recognized as making a good knife, what separates his knives from other makers?

    It doesn't take much of a reason or an excuse for some of us to purchase a new knife. I think that it has been longer then two years, since the forums have been aware of Cut Brooklyn. As far as I can recall, nobody has purchased one or at least posted about their purchase on the forum.

    Jay

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