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Thread: JNS 800 before Takashima?

  1. #11
    Senior Member
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    Jul 2013
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    450
    Less money, less time -> synthetics. More money, more time, more fun -> naturals.

    I think JBroida's point is that to save time he'd use synthetics up to the fineness of edge he'd like, which is around what your natural finisher is - your Takashima - and then switch to the natural to draw the benefits from using that. Can't blame him as I imagine he sharpens rather a lot of knives each day. You could easily use a coarser natural between your 800 and Takashima, though.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
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    Dec 2013
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    May i enter? I'm not sure that the real matter is the progression or the stone type or the grit of the whetstone. Every steel ( stainless or high-carbon) reacts differently on same whetstone ( whether synthetic or natural), so why not to ask what knife has to be sharp? Yeh - one can achieve the required edge on many abrasives - but if to go that far (diff. Jnats etc) , why not to take into consideration the type of the steel used in the knife? The softer steel can be sharpened even on the opposite side of the tea pot , doesn't it?
    57-59 R is not the same sharpening as 62-64R. The progression is different, the invested time etc. Stainless knife ( not the PM knives) are easier to resharpen as high-carbons. I have a good range of synthetics - and some high-quality 8000 grit synthetics - sometimes they are faster on some knives, but they never give me that sence and that feeling of the edge that the good Jnats does. I agree - this is about the time to invest , if we talk about a jump from 800 or some other coarse stone to a good Jnat. Earlier or later you will get your cutting edge in the desired condition, this is the question of time. One medium grit stone in-between would speed up the process.

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
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    160
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrey V View Post
    May i enter? I'm not sure that the real matter is the progression or the stone type or the grit of the whetstone. Every steel ( stainless or high-carbon) reacts differently on same whetstone ( whether synthetic or natural), so why not to ask what knife has to be sharp? Yeh - one can achieve the required edge on many abrasives - but if to go that far (diff. Jnats etc) , why not to take into consideration the type of the steel used in the knife? The softer steel can be sharpened even on the opposite side of the tea pot , doesn't it?
    57-59 R is not the same sharpening as 62-64R. The progression is different, the invested time etc. Stainless knife ( not the PM knives) are easier to resharpen as high-carbons. I have a good range of synthetics - and some high-quality 8000 grit synthetics - sometimes they are faster on some knives, but they never give me that sence and that feeling of the edge that the good Jnats does. I agree - this is about the time to invest , if we talk about a jump from 800 or some other coarse stone to a good Jnat. Earlier or later you will get your cutting edge in the desired condition, this is the question of time. One medium grit stone in-between would speed up the process.
    Yes, i know, normally the people say: the high-carbon knives are easier to resharpen then the stainless steel knives, but: i have 12 different stainless steel knives ( all in hight quality, the lowest range is- Arcos Top Line ( full metall- bought 15+ years ago), some Wuesthoff Master, some good japanese VG-10 like Hattori or Yaxell, also in different PM steels ) and 12+ good high-carbon knives- all Aogamis/Shirogamis, swedish steel /Shigefusa etc - so the range is just not so small to charge the difference - and the Tennen Toishi collection consists not from 1 or 2 stones- also some way to get some experience.
    Just 2 images- same stone- 2 knives - the black slurry comes from a simple Swiss Army Knife ( Wenger), a greenish one- from Yaxell GOU101 ( microcarbide powdered steel)- the difference is to see..


    when i sharpen the stainless steel knife- i stop just when it gets the keen edge- when i take the high-carbons- i can't stop.. So that's what i mean saying easier or not to resharpen...!

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