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Thread: Stabilizing/Dyeing Wood Question

  1. #11
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    Chef Niloc's Avatar
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    I have the turbo pro but I think they all come with the jar attachment? It's a hose hooked unto a top that fits over the top of a mason jar, works great. I tried this the first time becous I could not findj stabilized horn. The drop in atmosphere sucks the juice right in, works great. Only trouble is your limited to pieces that will fin in a 1/2 gal jar B/C that's as big as they make. I think Bill should use this on his sheep horn as it completely waterproofs the horn and does not change the look at all.

  2. #12
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Niloc View Post
    ?.. and does not change the look at all.
    ... That would have been my question, any residue on the outside? And how to get it off? I only have stag horn which looks pretty stable to me, not sure if that would help anything. But the question is: does this do anything positive for mammoth ivory? How about bone? Of course, it looks like this stuff may not be shipped to HI, that would end this project for me pretty early....

    Stefan

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by apicius9 View Post
    ... That would have been my question, any residue on the outside?
    No, not once it drys. Little dust that washes off with water.
    And how to get it off?
    turpentine or spirits when it's not set, once its set i dont think anything hurts it. Note i have not tryed sokeing after in solvents.
    I only have stag horn which looks pretty stable to me, not sure if that would help anything. But the question is: does this do anything positive for mammoth ivory? How about bone?
    the first time I used it was for stage horn but it was mostly B/C of the soft center stuff when the horn is still whole (don't know what this stuff is called?), not scales. I have never tried it on mammoth but it might..might make it less brittle???
    Here's the thing I have noticed with horn and bone, they all have these little pores in them and because of them they will swell if they get wet enough (like being used all day long in a kitchen). This stuff fills all those little holes and water proofs it. The stuff when dry is slightly flexible so it adds strength.[/QUOTE]
    Of course, it looks like this stuff may not be shipped to HI, that would end this project for me pretty early....
    I.D.K. But I think Wayne runs his shop out of his house so that might make it help?

    Just to make things clear so one of you don't screw up a $500 piece of mammoth and curse the day I was born. Here is what I have done. I had two handles one stag horn (previously mentioned) and one sheep horn (yes the Burke) that were starting to show singes that all the water was not a good thing for them. There was no way in hell I was going to F-up my Burke with one of my crazy "this should work" ideas. So I bought some sheep horn scales and a piece of horn and tried it with them first, and it worked great. I toucher tested them by soaking in water for days, running threw the dishwasher (high temp 185* water) at work. After all that I stabilized both knives and over a year now no trouble at all (note: I do not run knives threw the dishwasher ).
    Just playing around I have done a few blocks of wood, works great. Another experiment that I have not tried but might speed things up/ do a better job is heating the setup?? In theory this should help but again I have not tried it. I would think that stronger vac would definitely be needed if doing thicker pieces of dense material, say over 1.5", but again IDK as I have not tried it?? But i don't think any of you would need to do 4x4's?

  4. #14
    Collin, I am still not sure what you are using as far as equipment goes. Mind to post a link to a similar piece of equipment.

    The idea of stabilizing horn is very appealing to me, as buffalo horn is my preferred material.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  5. #15
    Some vacuum packaging machines (FoodSaver brand, maybe others) used to vacuum seal food items have a "mason jar" attachment so that instead of sealing a bag, there is a hose and special lid that fits mason jars so you can create a vacuum in the jar.

    http://www.amazon.com/FoodSaver-T03-.../dp/B0000CFFS6
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  6. #16
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    I just did a Nelsonite treatment on a curly maple handle I'm making for my latest knife. I vacuumed it with a commercial jewelry investment vacuum machine, it draws 29 inches if mercury and I let it sit in the chamber until the bubbling stopped, and about 5 minutes more.It looks to be well soaked, and now I just have to wait for it to cure. I'm going to try making a spacer out of some master alloy used to make white gold, but without the gold.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  7. #17
    How much would such a machine cost (jewelry investment vacuum machine) and is there an advantage over the setup Niloc was describing?

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  8. #18
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    This is the machine that I have:
    http://www.ottofrei.com/store/produc...productid=9107

    The advantage is the power of the suckage. I have it for casting jewelry, so using it for stabilizing wood is just a side advantage.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  9. #19
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    Speed, spike's would likely get the job done in 1/2 the time. But if you don't mindf letting it sit over night the food saver is a 1/4 the price and with the ease of swapping them out if they break at sir la table.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Niloc View Post
    Speed, spike's would likely get the job done in 1/2 the time. But if you don't mindf letting it sit over night the food saver is a 1/4 the price and with the ease of swapping them out if they break at sir la table.
    Colin, do you have any chamber vacuum machines at work for cryovac-ing food (for sous vide or freezing or whatever)? They can vac stuff with liquid in the bag, I imagine you could put the wood and however much resin you think it needs in the bag, vac it, and then let it sit forever how long it needs to soak up the resin.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

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