Quantcast
Takeda ....What to look for (now) to keep from getting screwed - Page 13
Page 13 of 19 FirstFirst ... 31112131415 ... LastLast
Results 121 to 130 of 182

Thread: Takeda ....What to look for (now) to keep from getting screwed

  1. #121
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    dirty south, louisiana
    Posts
    2,303
    My only point is that mine doesnt seem to wedge. we do use butternut squash at work and next time i cut one I'll be sure to try the takeda on it. I think the reason for there isnt any wedging is because the big nasty shoulders everybody seems to dislike are pretty asymetric. From a choil view my left shoulder is more pronounced or wider and the right shoulder is maybe 3-4mm taller and much flatter. I think the wedging would occur if the shoulders more even and the bevels similar. But theyre not.

  2. #122
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    3,574
    I'd say you got lucky, then. The asymmetry probably helps a great deal.

  3. #123
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    67
    I have two Takeda knives that would seem to illustrate this issue well. The word I would use is "inconsistent" but it definitely would not keep me from recommending his knives. The combination of the materials used, edge retention and keenness are excellent for the money. They are functional, practical knives that bear the abuse of a professional kitchen well. I have a Mioroshi Deba that I bought two years ago that drives me absolutely nuts, and a Honesuki that I bought earlier this year that was the exact opposite. The photo speaks for itself. I'm going to severely thin that Mioroshi Deba. I thought it maybe I was just misunderstanding the edge, like it had something to do with his somewhat unorthodox (to my understanding) sharpening style but now I see it was just the grind. That or maybe something to do with the fact that he calls a double bevel knife a "Deba" which is obviously a thick and heavy knife. Thank you everyone!

  4. #124
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pensacola, FL, USA
    Posts
    3,984
    Quote Originally Posted by ChefCosta View Post
    I have two Takeda knives that would seem to illustrate this issue well. The word I would use is "inconsistent" but it definitely would not keep me from recommending his knives. The combination of the materials used, edge retention and keenness are excellent for the money. They are functional, practical knives that bear the abuse of a professional kitchen well. I have a Mioroshi Deba that I bought two years ago that drives me absolutely nuts, and a Honesuki that I bought earlier this year that was the exact opposite. The photo speaks for itself. I'm going to severely thin that Mioroshi Deba. I thought it maybe I was just misunderstanding the edge, like it had something to do with his somewhat unorthodox (to my understanding) sharpening style but now I see it was just the grind. That or maybe something to do with the fact that he calls a double bevel knife a "Deba" which is obviously a thick and heavy knife. Thank you everyone!
    Takeda describes his "mioroshi-bocho" as a "long, narrow kitchen knife with a thick blade", and that's what you have. If you expected a knife with the geometry of a petty, then it's no wonder you are disappointed by it. It's never going to be good at dicing onions, or thinly slicing anything. That's what his petty knives and small yanagibas are good for.

    My mioroshi-bocho was very useful for chopping nuts, cutting hard cheeses, and any task where a more delicate blade might be damaged. It was a great knife for breaking down chickens as the edge was able to survive contact with bones without any problems. As I recall, the edge that Takeda put on it was about 20 -25 degrees a side, and I tried to keep it that way.

    Rather than attempting to thin your mioroshi-bocho, I'd suggest selling it and getting a small Takeda yanagiba. I doubt that thinning is the answer.

    Rick
    “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.”

  5. #125
    I've been lurking here for quite a while, but obviously this is my first post. I just received my Takeda Nakiri Bocho on Monday, and am very pleased and pleasantly surprised after monitoring this thread and a similar one over on the This Site Not Allowed Here.com forum. I'll put up a few pics of the knife for assurance, but wanted y'all to know that my nakiri is beautifully shaped and even lighter than i expected. It's advertised as 5.2 oz over on CKTG and mine weighs in at 4.8. As you will see, the blade is super thin (hasn't been thinned or sharpened since i got it) and I've cut carrots, potatoes, parsnips, onion, celery, minced herbs, garlic, brunoised shallots, cut through confit pork belly, printer paper, my arm hair and anything else i'm forgetting. I work in a professional kitchen and have handled most of my coworkers' knives that i covet, and I know 100% that this takeda is the sharpest out of the box knife in our kitchen, and the most coveted among coworkers who have used it. Anyway, sorry about the wall of text, just wanted to make my opinion clearly stated. Here are some pics. Obligatory apology about quality.. Iphone **** cam..

    So, as i said, i'm a newbie here and haven't quite figured out the whole "picture posting" thing. You'll find an album of 4 pics here:

    http://imgur.com/a/LItzA

    Edit: I can try to post any additional info/pics/vids if you would like.

  6. #126
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    dirty south, louisiana
    Posts
    2,303
    try an give your iphone a moment to focus before you take the choil shot pics. theyre kinda blurry. glad to hear your enjoying your knife. i work with a guy that loves his tanaka r2 nakiri, im trying to get him to upgrade to takeda. i hear nothing but good things about takeda nikiris.

  7. #127
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    687
    if you put something like a match on the heel close to the choil and focus on the match, you can get a good shot of the choil

  8. #128
    Thank you for the pointers KKF, i've taken a few more pics of the choil for a better understanding of the blade profile. If there are any more pointers on posting pics i'd be greatly encouraged, also if anything regarding pictures is more accepted please let me know. Below are a couple choil shots of my takeda nakiri. I am pleased.

  9. #129
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    67
    Pensacola Tiger,
    I only butcher fish, seam bone and portion meat with the Mioroshi-bocho. I use it in situations where the blade height of my Hon-deba makes for awkward knife strokes. Like I said I had trouble understanding and following Takeda's grind on the Mioroshi. Could totally be my fault. The grind on the honesuki was easy to find and follow. It would be easy for me to assume in the context of the previous 10 pages of posts about "wedge monsters" that my issues with the Mioroshi may have something to do with the grind. My plan is to thin it at the shoulders, widening the blade road, and put a compound bevel on it for strength though that steel with his heat treatment probably doesn't need it. I believe that Takeda puts a clamshell bevel anyway.

  10. #130
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    washington dc
    Posts
    1,395
    putting brain surgery and chainsaws into context is a bit extreme, but i'll bite on the car analogy. if one doesn't know how to drive manual transmission, then is it not logical to say that it's a bit nonsensical to use a 500HP sports car for learning? i know how to ride a motorcycle but have never actually owned one, and there's no way i would pick up a yamaha r1 as my first, more like kawasaki 250. by the way i love an m3 in stock form civic si not so much but would totally own an s2000 if it weren't for those damn digital gauges. but cars aren't my thing, i drive a plain civic ex, maybe get an rsx-s later that's about it.

    a purposely thick knife and complaining that it's not thin enough... i'll be nice and not touch that one, pensacola tiger has already explained the irony there.

    thinness is not all there is to blade performance. if you really want thinner behind the edge then that can be dealt with. however if it wasn't forged properly and that hollow in the middle of the blade faces is jacked up or incomplete then that is worthy of sending back. i think some folks are over reacting and trying to attack the problem instead of circumventing it all together by going in a more optimal path. ie get something with less variables.

    labor of love might be onto something with the asymmetry. i've come to realize that i grind the left shoulder smooth and keep the right one pretty 'wedgy' and it performs beautifully this way.

    on the other hand i'm willing to bet most takeda owners only got it because it looks cool not taking into considering its actual performance.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •