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Takeda ....What to look for (now) to keep from getting screwed - Page 14
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Thread: Takeda ....What to look for (now) to keep from getting screwed

  1. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChefCosta View Post
    Pensacola Tiger,
    I only butcher fish, seam bone and portion meat with the Mioroshi-bocho. I use it in situations where the blade height of my Hon-deba makes for awkward knife strokes. Like I said I had trouble understanding and following Takeda's grind on the Mioroshi. Could totally be my fault. The grind on the honesuki was easy to find and follow. It would be easy for me to assume in the context of the previous 10 pages of posts about "wedge monsters" that my issues with the Mioroshi may have something to do with the grind. My plan is to thin it at the shoulders, widening the blade road, and put a compound bevel on it for strength though that steel with his heat treatment probably doesn't need it. I believe that Takeda puts a clamshell bevel anyway.
    My remarks were based on the (incorrect) assumption that you were expecting something like a petty. The mioroshi I had was a shorter blade, but I don't recall a sharp shoulder. Your plan sounds as if it would work.



    Rick
    “Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”

  2. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by panda View Post
    on the other hand i'm willing to bet most takeda owners only got it because it looks cool not taking into considering its actual performance.
    I got one because I was hoping to avoid purchasing a lot of knives and there was some hype about his nakiri on these fora that I fell for.

    Now that I've mostly flattened the bevel, the thing seems to be an excellent anti-stick cutter with only slight wedge tendencies in thick stuff (it wedged in the raw 8cm carrot butt that I showed, but that's a little extreme). I might work on the asymmetry and final convexing a little to see if I can optimize it, but it's doing pretty well so far:

  3. #133
    Senior Member Mr.Magnus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by labor of love View Post
    I like the original grind your knives had more magnus. Mine is like that but the bevels and the grind are a bit more asymetrical. Amazing for food release. And just a fantastic cutter all around.
    let's agree to disagree. i had to use more force on potatos once the shoulder hit the surface of the potatos and it didnt cut smoothly, wedged thruw things almost like ripping in half. same with carrots.

  4. #134
    Senior Member Mr.Magnus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by panda View Post
    Wedging is not much of an issue with good technique. Those who can't alter geometries themselves shouldn't even bother with hand made knives.
    lol its not about "not beeing able to alter geometries" Not everyone has a grinding wheel in the livingroom nor willing to sit hours on a dmt plate to fix knives that are brand new and cost alot of money. When you pay a high price you want the knife to be done correctly not half done. Specially from a maker that have/had a very good reputation. Atleast thats what im expecting and many others to.

  5. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Magnus View Post
    lol its not about "not beeing able to alter geometries" Not everyone has a grinding wheel in the livingroom nor willing to sit hours on a dmt plate to fix knives that are brand new and cost alot of money. When you pay a high price you want the knife to be done correctly not half done. Specially from a maker that have/had a very good reputation. Atleast thats what im expecting and many others to.
    I agree. I was paranoid about my knife after I paid for it, and would have been very very discouraged from the hobby had it been as bad as some have gotten. Some folks don't mind the work...I'm waiting for a 300-grit stone to finish working a Zakuri bevel and think it's kind of enjoyable...but the knife only cost me $45usd or so. I haven't bothered trying to work on my $200+ Asai and have been wondering if I should track someone down to help...it's just sitting unused in the next room.

  6. #136
    Quote Originally Posted by panda View Post
    putting brain surgery and chainsaws into context is a bit extreme, but i'll bite on the car analogy. if one doesn't know how to drive manual transmission, then is it not logical to say that it's a bit nonsensical to use a 500HP sports car for learning? i know how to ride a motorcycle but have never actually owned one, and there's no way i would pick up a yamaha r1 as my first, more like kawasaki 250.
    I mean, you pretty much took my whole analogy way out of context or moved the goal posts.

    Not trying to be overly serious here, but I wasn't inferring anything about not knowing how to drive stick or being a wack new driver.

    I am saying you buy an M3 cause you know it's sick value for the money and a super fast, sick, fun car. You don't buy it expecting a Ferrari, but you do know it has the potential to literally match a Ferrari's performance with less cache if you send it to an elite tuner like Dinan or AC Schnitzer and dump $70K+ into on top of the sticker price.

    So when you buy a knife like a Takeda, although you know it won't ever reach it's full potential if you don't either know how to put it to the stones yourself or send it to an ace pro sharpener, you still expect it to be straight tight out of the box. What you don't expect and shouldn't accept is it being comparable to some $80 project knife when it cost at least $260 new.

    But again, I wasn't personally speaking about the Takeda, I'm just calling it by name in this post because this is a Takeda thread, I was/am speaking on your original comment that you shouldn't buy a handmade knife if you can't change geometries, basically inferring novice sharpeners shouldn't expect top notch performance out of the box and instead should expect a lame project knife.

  7. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Magnus View Post
    lol its not about "not beeing able to alter geometries" Not everyone has a grinding wheel in the livingroom nor willing to sit hours on a dmt plate to fix knives that are brand new and cost alot of money. When you pay a high price you want the knife to be done correctly not half done. Specially from a maker that have/had a very good reputation. Atleast thats what im expecting and many others to.
    Personally whenever I see "Takeda" now will just move away

  8. #138
    Just to add a couple thoughts I wasn't clear about...

    Yes, with a handmade rustic style blade and really any knife, there is expected upkeep and maintenance and just some touching up to get it where it should be, I think most here understand that, just like in the analogy, where most who buy an M3 understand it's more finicky and demanding then a regular Bimmer, but to beat a dead horse, it doesn't mean knives like these should come out of the box underperforming to the extreme where they're only comparable to a blade at a price point akin to literally a 3rd of it's value or less.

    That is all haha.

  9. #139
    I'm by no means an expert on knives but I would think there would be some level of consistency even with a completely handmade knife given his expertise.

    It also makes me wonder if the people who receive the ones with no issues are the ones made by Takeda himself while the other ones, like my wedgie, was made by an apprentice. It is an awesome cutter though, after it was thinned.

  10. #140
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by panda View Post
    putting brain surgery and chainsaws into context is a bit extreme, but i'll bite on the car analogy.
    It's called absurdum ad reductio, and this was a perfect use, if I do say so myself.

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