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How many amps and what kind of plug for my 220 volt plug.
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Thread: How many amps and what kind of plug for my 220 volt plug.

  1. #1
    Senior Member rockbox's Avatar
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    How many amps and what kind of plug for my 220 volt plug.

    I'm getting a 220 volt circuit put into the garage for my grinder. How many amps should I get and which type of nema plug?
    "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." --Albert Einstein

  2. #2
    I would put, and did put for that matter, a 30 amp circuit in. If I recall correctly, my grinder motor (the only thing 220 volt I currently have out there) only pulls like 8 amps at 220 volt. I put the 30 amp in case I ever got all carried away and wanted to put in a small subpanel to run other line's out there. It wasn't any more for me as the work was done as a favor, so I don't know how much more a 30 amp would cost over a 20 amp though.

    p.s. Your mailbox is full.

  3. #3
    The load from the grinder would dictate the amperage requirement- 20 or 30 amps are pretty common.

    The Receptacle you plug the machine into will also be driven by the piece of equipment that you are installing.

    You may want to add a small sub-panel and pull the 220 line from that, it will not be very much more money and would give you the option to add other circuits as your shop grows.

    Do you have a link to the grinder specs?

  4. #4
    I see that Adam is a much faster on the keyboard than me!

  5. #5
    Senior Member rockbox's Avatar
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    The grinder only needs about 8 amps but I may want to add other stuff to it like an oven. So I was thinking 30 amps. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something.
    "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." --Albert Einstein

  6. #6
    I would defiantly consider a sub panel then- and just drop a 15 Amp 220 for the grinder. if you make it a 60-80 amp panel then you will have lots of room for expansion and other gear that you can run simultaneously.

  7. #7
    Senior Member rockbox's Avatar
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    Why do I need a sub-panel? I have plenty of space in my existing panel.
    "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." --Albert Einstein

  8. #8
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    What Jim said. Over building this is something you will not regret. Under building, on the other hand........................
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by rockbox View Post
    Why do I need a sub-panel? I have plenty of space in my existing panel.
    You don't need per say. Running one line from your current panel to a sub panel and then distributing from there is easier than running a new circuit from the existing panel to the shop every time you add another piece of equipment. Getting a subpanel, or at least prepared for one now, will allow you to just run new lines from there to where ever you need them in the shop at later dates instead of continuously having to go back the main house panel.

  10. #10
    Senior Member rockbox's Avatar
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    Gotcha. My main panel is in the garage where all my stuff is.
    "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." --Albert Einstein

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