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  1. #11
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    You may reduce the steel's reactivity by applying a baking soda solution.
    Hot vinegar bath works well too.

  2. #12
    Senior Member TaJ's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the info. I'm not so keen on using abrasives and might just let the patina develop on its own or use my next duck breast to paint it blue.

    I've read that Japanese chefs keep the blades (almost?) patina free. Also, in online videos of Japanese chefs i see clean deba and yanagiba. How do they go about that? Are they using abrasive products on a daily basis? O do they use the baking soda solution or vinegar? If that reduces the steel's reactivity then this is worth a try, maybe for the fish-knives.

  3. #13
    Senior Member bkultra's Avatar
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    Japanese chefs clean their knives after every shift. Normally with powered cleanser and apply it with a daikon radish

  4. #14
    Senior Member TaJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkultra View Post
    Japanese chefs clean their knives after every shift. Normally with powered cleanser and apply it with a daikon radish
    That sounds like abrasive powder, maybe very fine. Might it be that in the radish there is some agent which helps cleanign? Interesting.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Notaskinnychef's Avatar
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    I love patina, personally i will never remove mine, but to each their own

  6. #16
    Senior Member Geo87's Avatar
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    Any kind of metal polish will do... Mag wheel polish... Whatever. You can get metal polish from most hardware stores .

    I only ever remove patina for the fun of putting it back on again!

    The warm blood patina so far is the best for me as I love blues
    You could polish it off and try again but smear the blood over the whole blade and leave for 5 mins or so.

  7. #17
    Senior Member TaJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geo87 View Post
    Any kind of metal polish will do... Mag wheel polish... Whatever. You can get metal polish from most hardware stores .

    I only ever remove patina for the fun of putting it back on again!

    The warm blood patina so far is the best for me as I love blues
    You could polish it off and try again but smear the blood over the whole blade and leave for 5 mins or so.
    I think that's what i'm going to try. Getting the finest grit kind of polish and remove the patina. Then fixing duck breast again and paint the knife with the juices.

  8. #18

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    japanese chefs use baking soda to clean their knives at the end of a shift. the radish, usually the ends or peel is used as a scrubber just because it's there and it's gentle. after it's cleaned down, they'll sharpen and polish. because they spend so much time polishing and maintaining, they'll probably never use hard abrasives as that stuff will ruin the finish and in the case of sushi/sashimi, affect the quality of the raw fish. sharpening will also remove patina, obviously.

    another important thing to note is they'll also have 2 towels out when cutting stuff. one is damp and laid next to the cutting board. this is used to wipe the knife down between cuts and keep food off the knife. the towel gets rinsed out under hot running water every now and then. the other towel is bone dry and used to dry the knife after cutting jobs.

    if you want to attempt to keep your carbon patina free, you'd need a similar regimen at the very least. if you're cutting meat or very acidic foods, consider using a stainless instead and use your carbons for low acid stuff or fish and white meat.

  9. #19
    Senior Member TaJ's Avatar
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    Ah i see. So, i'll try to do it this way (baking soda) when i use my Deba and Yanagiba the first time. If i can't remove the patina this way i'll use the polish. When you say they sharpen and polish, you mean polishing the edge, right? For preparing fish i think i can manage that kind of care and the other knives will be subject to experimenting with patina.

  10. #20
    Senior Member bkultra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TaJ View Post
    That sounds like abrasive powder, maybe very fine. Might it be that in the radish there is some agent which helps cleanign? Interesting.
    The radish could be replaced with something like a wine cork... The radish is just something they always have on hand and it works.

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