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  1. #1

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    Wootz

    I pretty much know the story behind this steel, the steel came from a mine in India and was a 1000 years ahead of its time and the mine only lasted for 200 years or so.

    some russian i think was able to reproduce it simular no more then a decade or two ago

    But how is this steel compared to others? to sharpen, hold an edge and so on?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sabaki View Post
    I pretty much know the story behind this steel, the steel came from a mine in India and was a 1000 years ahead of its time and the mine only lasted for 200 years or so.

    some russian i think was able to reproduce it simular no more then a decade or two ago

    But how is this steel compared to others? to sharpen, hold an edge and so on?
    The ore itself was only part of the equation; it's the casting of the ingot that was really interesting.

    From back when I was involved a little more, I remember Ric Furrer describing it as "diamonds in mud", referring to very hard carbides in a very soft surrounding matrix.

    It can probably make a nice kitchen knife, but its qualities are somewhat contrary to what is conventionally regarded as ideal for a standard chef knife...perhaps better for butchering or other applications.

  3. #3
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    mr drinky's Avatar
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    I have a couple wootz blades. One is a Pendray hunter and the other is a Furrer/HHH slicer.

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    I have a couple wootz blades. One is a Pendray hunter and the other is a Furrer/HHH slicer.

    k.
    i've seen the pictures of that amazing slicer of your's, how is that snakeskin sheet coming along?
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sabaki View Post

    some russian i think was able to reproduce it simular no more then a decade or two ago

    ?
    I could be wrong but I think Pendray is the guy that recreated this stuff? From my understanding the process created a superior steel back in the day when a lot of steel was crap. In other words modern steels are just as good if not superior to wootz, but the stuff sure is pretty.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by XooMG View Post
    The ore itself was only part of the equation; it's the casting of the ingot that was really interesting.

    From back when I was involved a little more, I remember Ric Furrer describing it as "diamonds in mud", referring to very hard carbides in a very soft surrounding matrix.

    It can probably make a nice kitchen knife, but its qualities are somewhat contrary to what is conventionally regarded as ideal for a standard chef knife...perhaps better for butchering or other applications.

    It's a very interesting steel to read about and it's made in various quality with carboncontent 0,8-2,0% and a very high density

    sword made by a mastersmith could cost as much as three elephants
    Vive pro omni die

  7. #7

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    i found this site describing how to make the stuff: http://www.antracit.se/index.php/sv/...77-dievar.html
    click on your flag to get the translation and scroll down
    Vive pro omni die

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sabaki View Post

    It's a very interesting steel to read about and it's made in various quality with carboncontent 0,8-2,0% and a very high density

    sword made by a mastersmith could cost as much as three elephants
    You'd need two elephants, and then it's just matter of time.

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