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Thread: Cheaper finishing salt?

  1. #1
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    Cheaper finishing salt?

    Does anyone know of a place that sells finishing salt for a decent price. I have been buying some here and there but I'd like to buy 4-5 kinds and not spend a fortune. I know its specialty so it's gonna cost but figured I'd see if anyone has seen something I have not.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    Have you been to A Southern Season? Not cheap but very good selection.
    once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

  3. #3
    Senior Member Casaluz's Avatar
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    I get all the salts I use (and I use several kinds) from the Meadow. Great quality, service and I believe it is not exorbitant price: https://www.atthemeadow.com/
    Depending on what do you want it for I could suggest a few:
    1) Sel Gris de Guérande: I buy this in 1 pound bags and use it at home for cooking, sauces, pasta, etc. https://www.atthemeadow.com/gourmet-...-sea-salt.html

    2) Amabito No Moshio Japanese Seaweed Sea Salt: I am partial to Japanese salts, and among those, this is the most exquisite finishing salt I have tasted for sashimi, ceviche, and fish in general. https://www.atthemeadow.com/gourmet-...-sea-salt.html

    3) Ara Shio Japanese Sea Salt: Wonderful finishing salt for meat and poultry, this is a great alternative as a finishing salt (also from Japan, and cheaper than Amabito No Moshio) https://www.atthemeadow.com/gourmet-...-sea-salt.html

    4) Peruvian Warm Springs Finishing Salt: this is an undiscovered finished salt that has great taste and consistency from a place that knows how to use salt in gastronomy, superb quality, and very, very reasonable price https://www.atthemeadow.com/gourmet-...-sea-salt.html

    5) Finally, I would like to point you to a (still) much lesser known wonderful salt: J. Q. Dickinson Saltworks from the Appalachian Mountains in West Virginia. Their story is extraordinary; the founders are trying to revive one of the most famous saltworks in the US with love , craftmanship and absolute passion for their land. Their salt is not only fantastic particularly in beef, but also for the meaning of what they are trying to build and the care they put into it. They deserve respect for their effort to rebuild old traditions from their land and bring back business sorely needed there. http://www.jqdsalt.com/timeline/
    -

  4. #4
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    what's finishing salt?

  5. #5
    Senior Member Casaluz's Avatar
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    A finishing salt is a salt used almost like a spice just before serving the food. Its flavor and texture should complement the dish. Many regular salts have anti caking agents and they taste bitter. A finishing salt is usually artisan and differ in taste, texture, humidity/water content/ and mineral content depending on how and where it was obtained. A common example (in my home) is flake salt from Maldon sprinkled on your vegetables in a salad just before adding olive oil and vinegar (in that order, although I am sure there will be disagreement with this), or fleur de salt over pork or beef, shio salt on top of fish or pink Himalayan salt hand grated (which by the way, does not come from the sea but from mines, and it does not come from the Himalayas but from Pakistan but is marketed that way not to offend some sensibilities) on top of sauce much like pepper, coarse Mediterranean salt on top of a porterhouse... it is fun to get a few distinct salts and conduct a "tasting"... by the way, I am not including flavored salts here, where the salt is mixed with other things for flavor, such as saffron, piment d'espelette, etc.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Roger's Avatar
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    What do you guys think about pink salt for all purpose use ? The one that is supposed to come from the Himalayan mountains. I have easy and inexpensive access to "Sel Gris de Guérande" and "Fleur de sel" since I live I France but I really like the powerful sodium content (I can use 10-20% less g's for the same flavor) and inner flavor, that pure mineral richness of the pink salt. That's what I mainly use. That pink stuff is expensive, so thanks there is "Sel Gris de Guérande" I buy that as my "cheap" salt to use for cooking water that will get tossed. I know this is still high quality so I sometimes use it for direct seasoning when I don't have time to find that other shaker.

    Salt with additives and even refined salt shouldn't even touch my kitchen. Yuck.

    That post revived my interest in exotic salts. Now I want to find a good EU supplier to sample some of the good stuff.

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    I really like the damp and strong texture of Sel Gris de Guerande and as you can't get it in supermaarkets over here anymore (UK) I get fro Amazon where it is super cheap for 5Kg.

    Black lava salt creates a talking point at the table and is interesting.

    I also import black salt from the Himalayas. There are numerous variations of volcanic rock salt and they usually look pinky coloured when ground.

    Malvern is a good workhorse salt and readily available. For cooking I mainly use unrefined sea salt, which is a quarter of the price of Malvern.

  8. #8
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  9. #9

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger View Post
    Salt with additives and even refined salt shouldn't even touch my kitchen. Yuck.
    There has been a huge increase in incidence of goiter due to the shift to sea salts in Australia. Iodine is a good thing.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Roger's Avatar
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    There is already enough natural iodine in some brands of bottled water I buy, since I drink a whole variety of brands, I don't need an extra dose of that stuff.

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