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Thread: What size saucepan can't you live without?

  1. #21
    I second the recommendation for a sauteuse evasee over a traditional, straight-sided sauce pan. It's much more versatile, has a smaller footprint on the stove and works for sauteeing and sauces (and pretty much everything else). Unless you require clad because of induction or ease of maintenance, I'd recommend getting something in 3mm thick, tin-lined copper from eBay. While anything from the Demeyere Atlantis line is excellent as far as clad cookware goes, the performance of thick copper is unmatched.

  2. #22
    Senior Member bkultra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardline_42 View Post
    I'd recommend getting something in 3mm thick, tin-lined copper from eBay.
    I do agree that thick vintage copper (3mm+) is excellent on a gas range. I do not agree that tin lined is the correct choice for most home users. First one has to be very experienced to make sure they do not damage it. Tin melts at 460F and this temperature is easy to reach if one is not careful or vigilant. Tin can also scratch or be damaged if the wrong utensils are used. If you do damage the lining it can be expensive to have it retinned (currently $5-8 per inch, including height). It is also more reactive than stainless steel.

    For a more worry free experience I would opt for stainless lined copper. Keep in mind I have nothing against tin lined. I just would not recommend it others. People that want and under stand what comes with tined lined already know about it. Anyone that is asking for a recommendation probably does not have the knowledge or technique to maintain it.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by bkultra View Post
    I do agree that thick vintage copper (3mm+) is excellent on a gas range. I do not agree that tin lined is the correct choice for most home users. First one has to be very experienced to make sure they do not damage it. Tin melts at 460F and this temperature is easy to reach if one is not careful or vigilant. Tin can also scratch or be damaged if the wrong utensils are used. If you do damage the lining it can be expensive to have it retinned (currently $5-8 per inch, including height). It is also more reactive than stainless steel.

    For a more worry free experience I would opt for stainless lined copper. Keep in mind I have nothing against tin lined. I just would not recommend it others. People that want and under stand what comes with tined lined already know about it. Anyone that is asking for a recommendation probably does not have the knowledge or technique to maintain it.
    I think the "pitfalls" of tin lining are a bit overblown, though it is undoubtedly more finicky than stainless and requires care (not unlike carbon steel and semi-stainless knives). One doesn't have to be "very experienced" to use it. Just don't heat an empty pot and keep the heat on medium, max (like with enameled cast iron). Use non-metal utensils (like on non-stick pans). Don't put in the dishwasher (like carbon steel, bare cast iron, fine china, cutlery, wood-handled utensils etc.). A tin lining can be repaired or replaced when damaged or worn. A stainless lining that separates due to overheating cannot. With regard to reactivity, it might not have the resistance to acidic food that stainless has, but it's leagues ahead of aluminum, cast iron, carbon steel and bare copper. It's also more naturally non-stick than stainless.

    Of course, that's not to say that tin-lined copper is for everyone. It is the ne plus ultra for heat response (actually, that would be silver-lined copper but it's too hard to find) and many home cooks gladly cope with the added maintenance for the extra performance while, for some others, it's not worth it. The reason I mention it as an option is because it's the only way to get copper thicker than 2.5mm which directly affects the pan's heat capacity and is definitely something noticeable to even new users versus a typical 1.5 or 2mm pan. Otherwise, the difference in performance between a 2.5mm tin-lined and a 2.5mm SS-lined will be lost on a casual user.

    Either way, it's good for the OP to hear from both sides on the issue of linings for copper cookware.

  4. #24
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    this might be a good pan for you, gavination.

  5. #25
    Senior Member gavination's Avatar
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    Hardline and bk, thanks for the awesome insight into copper sauciers, or rather copper in general! I had done a bunch of research into copper before and always sat on the fence regarding getting some. At this point, I think SS may be the way to go until I finish grad school and won't have people in my kitchen touching my copper! Otherwise, I don't mind the extra, anal retentive care. :lol:

    Edipis, it's funny you bring that up because I'm on my way to get the Atlantis one at SLT. It's a bit more expensive, but everything I have from Demeyere is from the same line. Therefore, I can't get an Industry 5. It simply won't match... Compulsion? Not at all!!

    You guys have been awesome as usual! I think I'm going to be rather stoked to be on the saucier bandwagon! I never would've thought I would be buying one!

  6. #26
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    If you change your mind and want to go for copper, Falk is having a sale right now.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  7. #27
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Copper does rock. I have about 10 pieces, mostly tinned, and I'm always looking for more.

  8. #28
    Senior Member gavination's Avatar
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    This is becoming a dangerous thread...

  9. #29
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    I love the way copper cooks, but it is really HEAVY. I got a 3-quart saucepan a while back, and hubby has been using it for different things and been really impressed. Then he used it to melt chocolate with butter the other day and grumbled mightily about the fact that it really is heavy when he had to hold the pan with one hand while scraping chocolate out with the other. (I didn't laugh in front of him. Really.)

    BTW, the new line from Falk with the stainless handle is really nice. It's more comfortable than the cast iron handle and stays a lot cooler.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  10. #30
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    CAST IRON HANDLES FOR LIFE. I also like 4mm thick 2.5 qt sauce pans that weigh 10 pounds, though, so maybe I'm weird. My particular example needs re-tinning, unfortunately, but it's amazing for hard boiled eggs. I bench over 300 pounds (or did, the last time I gave a **** about my body, which was in high school, half a life ago), though, so maybe the weight of copper is lost on me. My wife complained the one time she tried to use one, and never used one again, but that's a feature, not a bug.

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